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What setDateFormat option for NSDateFormatter do I use to get a month-day's ordinal suffix?

e.g. the snippet below currently produces:
3:11 PM Saturday August 15

What must I change to get:
3:11 PM Saturday August 15**th**

NSDate *date = [NSDate date];
NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = [[[NSDateFormatter alloc] init] autorelease];
[dateFormatter setFormatterBehavior:NSDateFormatterBehavior10_4];
[dateFormatter setDateFormat:@"h:mm a EEEE MMMM d"];
NSString *dateString = [dateFormatter stringFromDate:date]; 
NSLog(@"%@", dateString);

In PHP, I'd use this for the case above:
<?php echo date('h:m A l F jS') ?>

Is there an NSDateFormatter equivalent to the S option in the PHP formatting string?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 48 down vote accepted
NSDate *date = [NSDate date];
NSDateFormatter *prefixDateFormatter = [[[NSDateFormatter alloc] init] autorelease];
[prefixDateFormatter setFormatterBehavior:NSDateFormatterBehavior10_4];
[prefixDateFormatter setDateFormat:@"h:mm a EEEE MMMM d"];
NSString *prefixDateString = [prefixDateFormatter stringFromDate:date];
NSDateFormatter *monthDayFormatter = [[[NSDateFormatter alloc] init] autorelease];
[monthDayFormatter setFormatterBehavior:NSDateFormatterBehavior10_4];
[monthDayFormatter setDateFormat:@"d"];		
int date_day = [[monthDayFormatter stringFromDate:date] intValue];	
NSString *suffix_string = @"|st|nd|rd|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|st|nd|rd|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|st";
NSArray *suffixes = [suffix_string componentsSeparatedByString: @"|"];
NSString *suffix = [suffixes objectAtIndex:date_day];	
NSString *dateString = [prefixDateString stringByAppendingString:suffix];	
NSLog(@"%@", dateString);
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1  
Awesome Answer.... Good Code... Thanks Buddy... –  Dimple panchal Sep 28 '12 at 6:02
2  
The only improvement on this i might make would be to simply create the array instead of generating it from componentsSeparatedByString. This could be done easily with the Array literal syntax @[ @"st", @"nd", @"rd", ... ]; –  ericgorr Mar 4 '13 at 0:24
1  
You have a small bug in the code: NSString *suffix = [suffixes objectAtIndex:date_day]; That should be changed to NSString *suffix = [suffixes objectAtIndex:date_day-1]; because we always count from 0 :) . Otherwise good solution ! –  pe60t0 Mar 6 '13 at 16:43
2  
How is this a valid answer since it completely disregards the user's locale? NSDateFormatter simply does not support the feature. –  David James Apr 8 '14 at 14:29
    
To provide these suffixes for English speaking users but not offend the rest of the world, wrap the code in: if ([[[[NSBundle mainBundle] preferredLocalizations] objectAtIndex:0] isEqualToString:@"en"]) –  David James Apr 8 '14 at 14:48

None of these answers were as aesthetically pleasing as what I'm using, so I thought I would share:


Swift:

func daySuffix(date: NSDate) -> String {
    let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
    let dayOfMonth = calendar.component(.CalendarUnitDay, fromDate: date)
    switch dayOfMonth {
    case 1: fallthrough
    case 21: fallthrough
    case 31: return "st"
    case 2: fallthrough
    case 22: return "nd"
    case 3: fallthrough
    case 23: return "rd"
    default: return "th"
    }
}

Objective-C:

- (NSString *)daySuffixForDate:(NSDate *)date {
    NSCalendar *calendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
    NSInteger dayOfMonth = [calendar component:NSDayCalendarUnit fromDate:date];
    switch (dayOfMonth) {
        case 1:
        case 21:
        case 31: return @"st";
        case 2:
        case 22: return @"nd";
        case 3:
        case 23: return @"rd";
        default: return @"th";
    }
}

Obviously, this only works for English.

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This is the best answer! –  Sheharyar May 31 '14 at 21:13

Here's another implementation for a method to generate the suffix. The suffixes it produces are only valid in English and may not be correct in other languages:

- (NSString *)suffixForDayInDate:(NSDate *)date
{
    NSInteger day = [[[[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar] components:NSDayCalendarUnit fromDate:date] day];
    if (day >= 11 && day <= 13) {
        return @"th";
    } else if (day % 10 == 1) {
        return @"st";
    } else if (day % 10 == 2) {
        return @"nd";
    } else if (day % 10 == 3) {
        return @"rd";
    } else {
        return @"th";
    }
}
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2  
this fails for a day with value 11 –  djblue2009 Aug 23 '13 at 0:11
1  
easy fix, just check for day==11 first. –  Authman Apatira Sep 5 '13 at 0:36
2  
You are right - can't believe I didn't notice that. Fixed! –  SDJMcHattie Dec 16 '13 at 18:59

Date formatters on Mac OS 10.5 and the iPhone use TR35 as their format specifier standard. This spec doesn't allow for such a suffix on any date; if you want one, you'll have to generate it yourself.

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Matt Andersen's answer is quite elaborate, and so is SDJMcHattie. But NSDateFormatter is quite heavy on the cpu and if you call this 100x you really see the impact, so here is a combined solution derived from the answers above. (Please note that the above are still correct)

NSDateFormatter is crazily expensive to create. Create once and reuse, but beware: it's not thread safe, so one per thread.

Assuming self.date = [NSDate date];

   - (NSString *)formattedDate{

    static NSDateFormatter *_dateFormatter = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        _dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
        _dateFormatter.locale = [[NSLocale alloc] initWithLocaleIdentifier:@"en_US_POSIX"];
        _dateFormatter.timeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:0];
    });

    _dateFormatter.dateFormat = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"h:mm a EEEE MMMM d'%@'", [self suffixForDayInDate:self.date]];
   NSString *date = [_dateFormatter stringFromDate:self.date];

    return date;
}

/* SDJMcHattie's code, this is more convenient than using an array */

- (NSString *)suffixForDayInDate:(NSDate *)date{
    NSInteger day = [[[[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar] components:NSDayCalendarUnit fromDate:date] day];
    if (day >= 11 && day <= 13) {
        return @"th";
    } else if (day % 10 == 1) {
        return @"st";
    } else if (day % 10 == 2) {
        return @"nd";
    } else if (day % 10 == 3) {
        return @"rd";
    } else {
        return @"th";
    }
}

Output: 3:11 PM Saturday August 15th

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This will give string in format "10:10 PM Saturday, 2nd August"

   -(NSString*) getTimeInString:(NSDate*)date
    {
        NSString* string=@"";
        NSDateComponents *components = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] components: NSCalendarUnitDay fromDate:date];

        if(components.day == 1 || components.day == 21 || components.day == 31){
             string = @"st";
        }else if (components.day == 2 || components.day == 22){
            string = @"nd";
        }else if (components.day == 3 || components.day == 23){
             string = @"rd";
        }else{
             string = @"th";
        }

        NSDateFormatter *prefixDateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];    [prefixDateFormatter setFormatterBehavior:NSDateFormatterBehavior10_4];
        [prefixDateFormatter setDateFormat:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"h:mm a EEEE, d'%@' MMMM",string]];

        NSString *dateString = [prefixDateFormatter stringFromDate:date];

        return dateString;
    }
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   - (void)viewDidLoad
{ 
  NSDate *date = [NSDate date];
        NSDateFormatter *prefixDateFormatter = [[[NSDateFormatter alloc] init] autorelease];
        [prefixDateFormatter setDateFormat:@"yyy-dd-MM"];
        date = [prefixDateFormatter dateFromString:@"2014-6-03"]; //enter yourdate
        [prefixDateFormatter setFormatterBehavior:NSDateFormatterBehavior10_4];
        [prefixDateFormatter setDateFormat:@"EEEE MMMM d"];

        NSString *prefixDateString = [prefixDateFormatter stringFromDate:date];

        NSDateFormatter *monthDayFormatter = [[[NSDateFormatter alloc] init] autorelease];
        [monthDayFormatter setFormatterBehavior:NSDateFormatterBehavior10_4];

        [monthDayFormatter setDateFormat:@"d"];
        int date_day = [[monthDayFormatter stringFromDate:date] intValue];
        NSString *suffix_string = @"|st|nd|rd|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|st|nd|rd|th|th|th|th|th|th|th|st";
        NSArray *suffixes = [suffix_string componentsSeparatedByString: @"|"];
        NSString *suffix = [suffixes objectAtIndex:date_day];
        NSString *dateString = [prefixDateString stringByAppendingString:suffix];
        NSLog(@"%@", dateString);

}
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- (NSString *)dayWithSuffixForDate:(NSDate *)date {

    NSInteger day = [[[NSCalendar currentCalendar] components:NSDayCalendarUnit fromDate:date] day];

    NSString *dayOfMonthWithSuffix, *suffix  = nil ;

    if(day>0 && day <=31)
    {

        switch (day)
        {
            case 1:
            case 21:
            case 31: suffix =  @"st";
                break;
            case 2:
            case 22: suffix = @"nd";
                break;
            case 3:
            case 23: suffix = @"rd";
                break;
            default: suffix = @"th";
                break;
        }


            dayOfMonthWithSuffix = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%ld%@", (long)day , suffix];
    }


    return dayOfMonthWithSuffix;
}
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I added these two methods to NSDate with a category NSDate+Additions.

\- (NSString *)monthDayYear 
{

    NSDateFormatter * dateFormatter = NSDateFormatter.new;
    [dateFormatter setDateFormat:@"MMMM d*, YYYY"];
    NSString *dateString = [dateFormatter stringFromDate:self];

    return [dateString stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString:@"*" withString:[self ordinalSuffixForDay]];
}

\- (NSString *)ordinalSuffixForDay {

NSDateFormatter * dateFormatter = NSDateFormatter.new;
[dateFormatter setDateFormat:@"d"];
NSString *dateString = [dateFormatter stringFromDate:self];
NSString *suffix = @"th";

if ([dateString length] == 2 && [dateString characterAtIndex:0] == '1') {
    return suffix;
}

switch ([dateString characterAtIndex:[dateString length]-1]) {
    case '1':
        suffix = @"st";
        break;
    case '2':
        suffix = @"nd";
        break;
    case '3':
        suffix = @"rd";
        break;
}

return suffix;
}

You could make them more efficient by combining them and indexing the one's place digit of the day within your format string as the switch point. I opted to separate the functionality so the ordinal suffixes can be called separately for different date formats.

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Or if you want the suffix for any number:

extension Int {

    public func suffix() -> String {
        let absSelf = abs(self)

        switch (absSelf % 100) {

        case 11...13:
            return "th"
        default:
            switch (absSelf % 10) {
            case 1:
                return "st"
            case 2:
                return "nd"
            case 3:
                return "rd"
            default:
                return "th"
            }
        }
    }
}

The thinking being that there are 5 possibilities for positive numbers. It's first place digit is 1 being "st". It's second place digit is 2 being "2nd". It's third place digit is 3 being "rd". Any other case is "th", or if it's second place digit is 1, then the above rules do not apply and it is "th".

Modulo 100 gives us the digit's last two numbers, so we can check for 11 to 13. Modulo 10 gives us the digit's last number, so we can check for 1, 2, 3 if not caught by the first condition.

Try that extension in playgrounds:

let a = -1 

a.suffix() // "st"

let b = 1112 

b.suffix() // "th"

let c = 32 

c.suffix() // "nd"

Would love to see if there is an even shorter way to write this using binary operations and/or an array!

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This is easily done as of iOS9

NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init];
formatter.numberStyle = NSNumberFormatterOrdinalStyle;
NSArray<NSNumber *> *numbers = @[@1, @2, @3, @4, @5];

for (NSNumber *number in numbers) {
    NSLog(@"%@", [formatter stringFromNumber:number]);
}
// "1st", "2nd", "3rd", "4th", "5th"

Taken from NSHipster

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The NSDateFormatter documentation says that all the format options it supports are listed in TR35.

Why do you want this? If you're making something for a machine to parse, you should use ISO 8601 format, or RFC 2822 format if you have to. Neither one of those requires or allows an ordinal suffix.

If you're showing dates to the user, you should use one of the formats from the user's locale settings.

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1  
Obviously the reason is that he'd like to format something that the user will be reading. In fact, it seems to me you aught to rarely have a machine parsing a date sent from another one... it seems like you'd choose to pass the date as long milliseconds since Jan 1, 1970. –  ArtOfWarfare Sep 22 '12 at 23:59

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