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  1. Is there a better way to add a list to another existing list than what I have coded in the add method ?
  2. Is the way to remove a list of songs from a playlist correct or am I going to hit concurrent modification exception ?

    class Playlist
    {
    List<Song> playList;
    public void addSongs(List<Song> songs)
    {
      for(Song s:songs)
      playList.add(s);
    }
    
    public void removeSongs(List<Song> songs)
    {
      for(Song s:songs)
      if(playList.contains(s))
      playList.remove(s);
    }
    
    
    }
    
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I'm creating the playList = new ArrayList .. in the constructor so I'm not going to have null ptr exception. –  Phoenix Oct 11 '12 at 1:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To add all the elements from one list to another, use;

List.addAll

Appends all of the elements in the specified collection to the end of this list, in the order that they are returned by the specified collection's iterator

To remove all the elements from one list from another use;

List.removeAll

Removes from this list all of its elements that are contained in the specified collection

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Okay. But what about the way I have coded it ? Does collections API also use the same thing under the hood ? –  Phoenix Oct 11 '12 at 1:49
1  
@Phoenix You can be sure that it does it better than you do. –  Jagger Oct 11 '12 at 1:51
    
I'm not questioning that. But wondering since this is modification of the list while iterating it does it result in concrrent modification exception –  Phoenix Oct 11 '12 at 1:55
    
It will depend upon the implementation, but ArrayList automatically resizes it's backing array BEFORE adding new items, meaning it won't suffer from any slow downs as the list tries to increase it's buffer during the add –  MadProgrammer Oct 11 '12 at 1:56
    
@Phoenix You're not iterating from the list your modifying, it will have not impact on it. List's are not Thread safe. Concurrent modifications could cause a mutation exception. Are you accessing this methods from more then one thread simultaneously?? –  MadProgrammer Oct 11 '12 at 2:03

In reference to your version of removeSongs

But wondering since this is modification of the list while iterating it does it result in concrrent modification exception

Assuming that the lists are instances of the standard list classes, your code should not throw a CME.

A CME is typically thrown if you modify a collection while iterating it (apart from when you use Iterator.remove() ...). You code is iterating songs and modifying playlist. This won't result in a CME in the code shown.

However, if some other code is iterating the playlist concurrently with this code, that other code could get a CME the next time it uses its iterator. Similarly, if some other code modifies songs while your code is iterating it, then this code could throw a CME. (You would need to look at the rest of your code to figure out if either of these scenarios is possible.)

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Use the addAll() and removeAll() methods:

playList.addAll(songs);

playList.removeAll(songs);
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Instantiate your List

class Playlist
{
List<Song> playList;
public Playlist(){
 playList = new ArrayList<Song>();
}

You don't need a loop here. Use addAll instead.

public void addSongs(List<Song> songs)
{
  playList.addAll(songs);
}

You also don't need a loop here. Use removeAll instead.

public void removeSongs(List<Song> songs)
{
  playList.removeAll(songs);
}


}
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