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So I am print_r-ing an array, generated as follows:

while ($twitgroup = mysql_fetch_array($resulttwitter)) {
print_r($twitgroup);
}

I get this output (with multiple more arrays, dependent on rows).

Array ( [0] => composed [category] => composed [1] => 330 [value] => 330 [2] => 1344384476.94 [timestamp] => 1344384476.94 ) Array ( [0] => elated [category] => elated [1] => 2034 [value] => 2034 [2] => 1344384476.94 [timestamp] => 1344384476.94 ) Array ( [0] => unsure [category] => unsure [1] => 2868 [value] => 2868 [2] => 1344384476.94 [timestamp] => 1344384476.94 ) Array ( [0] => clearheaded [category] => clearheaded [1] => 1008 [value] => 1008 [2] => 1344384476.94 [timestamp] => 1344384476.94 ) Array ( [0] => tired [category] => tired [1] => 2022 [value] => 2022 [2] => 1344384476.94 [timestamp] => 1344384476.94 ) 

I want to be able to pull individual values here, but I'm having trouble. I'm trying to use a while loop on these arrays, but I think maybe that's wrong. Should I perhaps use a foreach loop, and then on the output of that foreach, access each element of the array?

Say for example, I want to grab composed, and the value of composed. How would I do that?

I'm pretty good with arrays/lists in Python, but my experience with arrays in PHP is somewhat lacking.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Use

while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($resulttwitter)) {
  $twitgroup[$row['category']] = $row;
}

echo $twitgroup['composed']['value'];     // outputs 330 
echo $twitgroup['composed']['timestamp']; // outputs 1344384476.94

If you only want categories and their values use

while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($resulttwitter)) {
  $twitgroup[$row['category']] = $row['value'];
}

echo $twitgroup['composed'];     // outputs 330 
share|improve this answer

Replace mysql_fetch_array with mysql_fetch_assoc to eliminate duplicates. Then this:

while ($twitgroup = mysql_fetch_assoc($resulttwitter)) 
{
    foreach ($twitgroup as $key => $value)
    {
        echo "$key => $value\n";
    }
}

You could also get the elements by name:

while ($twitgroup = mysql_fetch_assoc($resulttwitter)) 
{
    echo "category => " . $twitgroup["category"] . "\n";
    echo "value => " . $twitgroup["value"] . "\n";
    echo "timestamp => " . $twitgroup["timestamp"] . "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need to mysql_fetch_assoc as mysql_fetch_array will build both associative and numeric keys. –  Burhan Khalid Oct 11 '12 at 4:01
    
Correct. However, in the foreach version, it would have printed the values two times: once for the numeric keys, once for the string keys. Unless I'm mistaken. Anyway, that is the only reason I changed it to mysql_fetch_assoc. –  Geoff Montee Oct 11 '12 at 4:05
    
I meant for the second example. –  Burhan Khalid Oct 11 '12 at 4:07
    
Yeah. To make the second example, I just copied my first example and modified it slightly. It obviously doesn't matter for that one. –  Geoff Montee Oct 11 '12 at 4:08

mysql_fetch_array includes each field twice in the result, one associated with a numeric key and one with the field name.

That is why you have

   [0] => composed 
   [category] => composed
   [1] => 330 
   [value] => 330

You can access field either like :

  $twitgroup[0]

or like :

  $twitgroup['category']

So, you can access your each row like :

  while ($twitgroup = mysql_fetch_array($resulttwitter)) {
          print $twitgroup['category']; // or print $twitgroup['0'];
          print $twitgroup['value']; // // or print $twitgroup['1'];

          // or by the corresponding numeric indices.

   }

If at all you want to limit your result to either numeric or Associative array, add an additional flag (result_type) to your mysql_fetch_array :

   mysql_fetch_array ($resulttwitter, MYSQL_ASSOC) // or mysql_fetch_array ($resulttwitter, MYSQL_NUM)

Having said all this, it is highly discouraged using mysql_* functions in PHP since they are deprecated. You should use either mysqli or PDO instead.

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This is what you have:

  Array ( 
    [0]         => composed 
    [category]  => composed 
    [1]         => 330  
    [value]     => 330 
    [2]         => 1344384476.94 
    [timestamp] => 1344384476.94 
) Array (
    [] =>
    [] =>
    ...
) ...

Arrays in PHP are called associative arrays because they can have either keys out of integers, strings or anything else. You have an array with arrays in it.

To access the individual fields, it would be most convenient to use a for each loop.

$record=0;
foreach ($array as $k => $subArray) {
    $record++;
    foreach($subArray as $field => $value) {
        printf("%d: %s = %s\n", $record, $field, $value);
    }
}

Its seems to me that there is something wrong with the way you are fetching the data, becasue half the fields seem redundant. You can use the string keys to figure out the contents. so there is no need for the n => name entries.

If that can't be helped, I guess you could iterate over the values with

$ix=0;
for ($i=0; $i < (count($array)/2); $i++){
   printf("%s\n", $array[$ix]);
   $ix++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is nothing wrong with what he is doing. That is the default behavior of mysql_fetch_array: php.net/manual/en/function.mysql-fetch-array.php –  Geoff Montee Oct 11 '12 at 4:16
    
Cool. I didn't use PHP for anything with mysql before PHP went all object oriented. I don't know the old methods, or the PDO classes tbh. –  Ярослав Рахматуллин Oct 11 '12 at 4:25
    
You're better off. I don't know why people don't switch to PDO or MySQL-Improved from this old API. They should do it for prepared statements, if no other reason. –  Geoff Montee Oct 11 '12 at 4:33
    
I looked at the page. And I do think it's wrong to fetch both an int indexed array and a string indexed array combined into one. –  Ярослав Рахматуллин Oct 11 '12 at 4:37
    
It may be unusual and undesired. But I would be hesitant to say it is wrong, considering it is the default behavior. I would even say that it is stupid if you plan to use foreach loops. If you look at my answer, I used mysql_fetch_assoc instead of mysql_fetch_array. But regardless, no one ever said PHP was designed in a logical manner: me.veekun.com/blog/2012/04/09/php-a-fractal-of-bad-design –  Geoff Montee Oct 11 '12 at 4:42

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