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I have this table in postgreSQL v9.1:

CREATE TABLE ad_treenodemm
(
  ad_tree_id numeric(10,0) NOT NULL,
  node_id numeric(10,0) NOT NULL,
  ad_client_id numeric(10,0) NOT NULL,
  ad_org_id numeric(10,0) NOT NULL,
  name character varying(60) NOT NULL,
  isactive character(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'Y'::bpchar,
  created timestamp without time zone NOT NULL DEFAULT now(),
  createdby numeric(10,0) NOT NULL,
  updated timestamp without time zone NOT NULL DEFAULT now(),
  updatedby numeric(10,0) NOT NULL,
  parent_id numeric(10,0),
  seqno numeric(10,0),
  CONSTRAINT ad_treenodemm_pkey PRIMARY KEY (ad_tree_id , node_id ),
  CONSTRAINT adtree_adtreenodemm FOREIGN KEY (ad_tree_id)
      REFERENCES adempiere.ad_tree (ad_tree_id) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED,
  CONSTRAINT ad_treenodemm_isactive_check CHECK (isactive = ANY (ARRAY['Y'::bpchar, 'N'::bpchar]))
)


Important columns description:
* ad_tree_id = The tree group id (connected to ad_tree table)
* node_id = The node id
* parent_id = The parent node id (if 0 => means the node is on the top)

The rests of columns can be ignored.


For example, I have the ad_treenodemm table data presentation like this:

# Group1 (all node belows are assigned with ad_tree_id=1001)
    -Accounting (node_id=101, parent_id=0)
        -Costing (node_id=202, parent_id=101)
            -Cost Type (node_id=103, parent_id=202)
            -Cost Element (node_id=24, parent_id=202)
        -Client Accounting Processor (node_id=105, parent_id=101)
        -Reset Accounting (node_id=6, parent_id=101)
            ...

    -Finance (node_id=4110, parent_id=0)
        ...

# Group2 (all node belows are assigned with ad_tree_id=1002)
    ...

Let's say, I want to delete Accounting node and its child nodes in the Group1. That means, it also deletes node: Costing, Cost Type, Cost Element, Reset Accounting,...etc. How to do it?

The solution can be in SQL or Java language with JDBC (but SQL would be preferred if possible).


UPDATE: I found a solution with WITH RECURSIVE (CTE) sql, however it's not too elegant:

WITH RECURSIVE temp(ad_tree_id, node_id, parent_id) AS (
    SELECT a.ad_tree_id, a.node_id, a.parent_id
    FROM ad_treenodemm a 
    WHERE ad_tree_id=1001 AND node_id=101      -- look at this

    UNION ALL

    SELECT b.ad_tree_id, b.node_id, b.parent_id
    FROM ad_treenodemm b
    INNER JOIN temp c on c.node_id = b.parent_id
    WHERE b.ad_tree_id=c.ad_tree_id
)
DELETE FROM ad_treenodemm a
WHERE (a.ad_tree_id, a.node_id) IN (
    SELECT ad_tree_id, node_id FROM temp
);

You see that I put the argument ( WHERE ad_tree_id=1001 AND node_id=101) inside the WITH clause. Anyone know how to improve the SQL by putting the argument statement outside the WITH clause?

For anyone who want to experiment the query without deleting the records, use this:

WITH RECURSIVE temp(ad_tree_id, node_id, parent_id) AS (
    SELECT a.ad_tree_id, a.node_id, a.parent_id
    FROM ad_treenodemm a 
    WHERE ad_tree_id=1001 AND node_id=101

    UNION ALL

    SELECT b.ad_tree_id, b.node_id, b.parent_id
    FROM ad_treenodemm b
    INNER JOIN temp c on c.node_id = b.parent_id
    WHERE b.ad_tree_id=c.ad_tree_id
)
SELECT * FROM ad_treenodemm a
WHERE (a.ad_tree_id, a.node_id) IN (
    SELECT ad_tree_id, node_id FROM temp
)
ORDER BY a.parent_id, a.node_id
share|improve this question
    
Why not put an ON DELETE CASCADE foreign key on parent_id? This seems to be a perfect use case for it. –  lc. Oct 11 '12 at 5:47
1  
@suuid If I understand your schema correctly: FOREIGN KEY (ad_tree_id, parent_id) REFERENCES ad_treenodemm(ad_tree_id, node_id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE –  Craig Ringer Oct 11 '12 at 6:44
2  
@suuid This is an ideal case for a recursive common table expression (Recursive CTE, or WITH RECURSIVE). See postgresql.org/docs/current/static/queries-with.html –  Craig Ringer Oct 11 '12 at 6:45
1  
Here is good article (slideshare.net/quipo/…) about storing trees in databases. It contains SQL samples for basic CRUD operations in different types of trees. Another way is to use CTE to select all nodes that belong to a tree branch and delete them. –  Konstantin V. Salikhov Oct 11 '12 at 8:24
2  
@suud: NULL is explicitly not the same as anything. NULL isn't even the same as NULL. Whenever you compare anything to NULL, the result is NULL. You need to understand that or you will be lost in database wonderland. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 11 '12 at 22:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you don't want to "alter the table structure", you are down to a recursive query anyway (or a function doing the work recursively). Because adding a FK constraint would qualify as "altering the table structure".

Without these restrictions the most elegant solution would be to fix the NULL values you mentioned and add a NOT NULL constraint to the column. Then add the FK constraint with ON DELETE CASCADE as mentioned in the comments, first by @lc.

Recursive query

DELETE with writeable CTE could look like this:

WITH RECURSIVE x AS (
   SELECT ad_tree_id, node_id
   FROM   ad_treenodemm
   WHERE (ad_tree_id, node_id) = (1,5)   -- enter dead node walking here

   UNION  ALL
   SELECT a.ad_tree_id, a.node_id
   FROM   x
   JOIN   ad_treenodemm a ON a.parent_id = x.node_id
   )
DELETE FROM ad_treenodemm a
USING  x
WHERE (a.ad_tree_id, a.node_id) = (x.ad_tree_id, x.node_id)

To do this in one step you need PostgreSQL 9.1 or later for data-modifying CTEs. Else you have to run a separate SELECT to collect the rows and then DELETE.

-> Live demo @sqlfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, it looks cooler than mine :). So the "dead node" must exist inside the WITH clause? Why x doesn't has (..., ...) parameters and what is USING mean? –  suud Oct 13 '12 at 10:58
    
@suud: Column names for CTEs are optional. If you don't spell them out, names of the SELECT items are used. USING is PostgreSQL's way to join in tables to a DELETE statement. Consult the manual for details here. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 13 '12 at 13:00

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