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I need some Perl regular expression help. The following snippet of code:

use strict; 
use warnings; 
my $str = "In this example, A plus B equals C, D plus E plus F equals G and H plus I plus J plus K equals L"; 
my $word = "plus"; 
my @results = ();
1 while $str =~ s/(.{2}\b$word\b.{2})/push(@results,"$1\n")/e;
print @results;

Produces the following output:

A plus B
D plus E
2 plus F
H plus I
4 plus J
5 plus K

What I want to see is this, where a character already matched can appear in a new match in a different context:

A plus B
D plus E
E plus F
H plus I
I plus J
J plus K

How do I change the regular expression to get this result? Thanks --- Dan

share|improve this question
    
Thanks Greg, Sinan and Michael for the quick response. Full Disclosure: the example cited is a simplification, $str is actually 500k chars of text from a product user manual, $word is one element in a long list of possible word hits, {2} is actually {35} and can capture any characters found around "plus" in the text in order to build a complete concordance of how "plus" is used in the doc, so points awarded for fastest performance --- Dan –  dlw Aug 16 '09 at 3:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

General advice: Don't use s/// when you want m//. Be specific in what you match.

The answer is pos:

#!/usr/bin/perl -l

use strict;
use warnings;

my $str = 'In this example, ' . 'A plus B equals C, ' .
          'D plus E plus F equals G ' .
          'and H plus I plus J plus K equals L';

my $word = "plus";

my @results;

while ( $str =~ /([A-Z] $word [A-Z])/g ) {
    push @results, $1;
    pos($str) -= 1;
}

print "'$_'" for @results;

Output:

C:\Temp> b
'A plus B'
'D plus E'
'E plus F'
'H plus I'
'I plus J'
'J plus K'
share|improve this answer
1  
Ah, essentially the same answer but you cleaned up the regex too. –  Michael Carman Aug 16 '09 at 3:00
1  
pos just feels cleaner than substr. –  Sinan Ünür Aug 16 '09 at 3:04
    
+1 for pos. Didn't know about that one. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 16 '09 at 4:11

You can use a m//g instead of s/// and assign to the pos function to rewind the match location before the second term:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $str  = 'In this example, A plus B equals C, D plus E plus F equals G and H plus I plus J plus K equals L';
my $word = 'plus';
my @results;

while ($str =~ /(.{2}\b$word\b(.{2}))/g) {
    push @results, "$1\n";
    pos $str -= length $2;
}
print @results;
share|improve this answer

Another option is to use a lookahead:

use strict; 
use warnings; 
my $str = "In this example, A plus B equals C, D plus E "
        . "plus F equals G and H plus I plus J plus K equals L"; 
my $word = "plus"; 
my $chars = 2;
my @results = ();

push @results, $1 
  while $str =~ /(?=((.{0,$chars}?\b$word\b).{0,$chars}))\2/g;

print "'$_'\n" for @results;

Within the lookahead, capturing group 1 matches the word along with a variable number of leading and trailing context characters, up to whatever maximum you've set. When the lookahead finishes, the backreference \2 matches "for real" whatever was captured by group 2, which is the same as group 1 except that it stops at the end of the word. That sets pos where you want it, without requiring you to calculate how many characters you actually matched after the word.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for posting, I learned more about regex looking at this. I wonder, which is faster, this solution or Sinan's which uses pos()? –  dlw Aug 18 '09 at 2:56
    
They're not really equivalent. Sinan's code, which is based on your original question, matches exactly 2 extra characters at either end, and bumps pos back exactly one position. Mine allows for a variable number of context characters (with 2 being the max in this case), which seems more realistic after reading your "Full Disclosure" comment. My solution can more usefully be compared to ysth's, and I would expect his to be faster because it lets the regex engine find the match for \b$word\b without putting a reluctant quantifier in its way. –  Alan Moore Aug 18 '09 at 13:00

Given the "Full Disclosure" comment (but assuming .{0,35}, not .{35}), I'd do

use List::Util qw/max min/;
my $context = 35;
while ( $str =~ /\b$word\b/g ) {
    my $pre = substr( $str, max(0, $-[0] - $context), min( $-[0], $context ) );
    my $post = substr( $str, $+[0], $context );
    my $match = substr( $str, $-[0], $+[0] - $-[0] );
    $pre =~ s/.*\n//s;
    $post =~ s/\n.*//s;
    push @results, "$pre$match$post";
}
print for @results;

You'd skip the substitutions if you really meant (?s:.{0,35}).

share|improve this answer

Here's one way to do it:

use strict; 
use warnings; 
my $str = "In this example, A plus B equals C, D plus E plus F equals G and H plus I plus J plus K equals L"; 
my $word = "plus"; 
my @results = ();
my $i = 0;
while (substr($str, $i) =~ /(.{2}\b$word\b.{2})/) {
    push @results, "$1\n";
    $i += $-[0] + 1;
}
print @results;

It's not terribly Perl-ish, but it works and it doesn't use too many obscure regular expression tricks. However, you might have to look up the function of the special variable @- in perlvar.

share|improve this answer

don't have to use regex. basically, just split up the string, use a loop to go over each items, check for "plus" , then get the word from before and after.

my $str = "In this example, A plus B equals C, D plus E plus F equals G and H plus I plus J plus K equals L"; 
@s = split /\s+/,$str;
for($i=0;$i<=scalar @s;$i++){
    if ( "$s[$i]"  eq "plus" ){
        print "$s[$i-1] plus $s[$i+1]\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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