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Consider I have following beans:

@Entity
public class Currency {

    private String currency;

    public String getCurrency() {
        return currency;
    }

    public void setCurrency(String currency) {
        this.currency = currency;
    }
}

@Entity
public class SomeEntity  {
    private Currency currency;

    public Currency getCurrency() {
        return currency;
    }

    public void setCurrency(Currency currency) {
        this.currency = currency;
    }
}

I have instance of SomeEntity:

SomeEntity entity;

In some place in code I'd like to use some entity's property, but entity could be null and some of entity's properties could be null, so my current code implementation is far from easy-to-read:

new ConstantExpression(entity == null ? null : entity.getCurrency() != null ? entity.getCurrency().getId() : null)

Is there any approaches to improve code readability for this case?

Update: My codebase is big enough, so Null object pattern implementation require a lot of modifications. In addition, my beans are persisted to db with JPA, so I'll have to do extra coding like Cascade annotations and so on.

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1  
new ConstantExpression ((entity == null || entity.getCurrency() == null)? null : entity.getCurrency().getId());? –  Buhake Sindi Oct 11 '12 at 8:04
    
int i = 0; if(entity.getCurrency() !=null) i = entity.getCurrency().getId(); new ConstantExpression(entity == null ? null :i) –  Sardor Dushamov Oct 11 '12 at 8:05

4 Answers 4

You could simply implement a decorator which takes an entity and simply provides convenience access methods.

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Although I don't like using them, some people use "Null" objects which are full of "Null" values and objects instead of using null.

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You could use the Null Object Pattern.

  • Create a subclass of Currency where getId() always returns null
  • Have a single instance of this class which you use to initialize all currency fields.
  • Now getCurrency().getId() is safe.
  • If you wish, repeat the same for SomeEntity
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Because of the way the language is designed, we will never be completely free of null checks. But when they just get too annoying here is one thing I like to do.

Create a "utils" class that does the null checks for you. Once I found StringUtils in commons-lang, it was such an "aha" moment. Imagine you have two strings that you need to compare for equality.

String a;
String b;
// code goes here. a and/or b may or may not be initialized

if (a.equals(b))
{
    // do something
}

As you are painfully aware, the code above is at risk of having a NullPointerException. So instead we must write:

if (a != null && a.equals(b))
{
    // do something
}

Enter StringUtils. Instead we write

if (StringUtils.equals(a,b))
{
    // do something
}

If that is too verbose or if I am doing lots of equals in this code we could use a static import:

import static org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils.*;
//...

if (equals(a,b))
{
    // do something
}

Voila - instant concise code. How is this magic achieved? No magic, just put the null checks in the static method. Here is the implementation of StringUtils:

public static boolean equals(CharSequence cs1, CharSequence cs2) {
    if (cs1 == cs2) {
        return true;
    }
    if (cs1 == null || cs2 == null) {
        return false;
    }
    if (cs1 instanceof String && cs2 instanceof String) {
        return cs1.equals(cs2);
    }
    return CharSequenceUtils.regionMatches(cs1, false, 0, cs2, 0, Math.max(cs1.length(), cs2.length()));
}

In your case, consider writing a utils class like this:

public class MyUtils
{
   public static String getCurrencyId(Currency currency)
   {
      if (currency == null)
         return null;
      return currency.getId();
   }

   public static String getCurrencyId(SomeEntity entity)
   {
      if (entity == null)
         return null;
      return getCurrencyId(entity.getCurrency())
   }
}

Now in the calling code just do

import static mypackage.MyUtils.*;

new ConstantExpression(getCurrencyId(entity));

Yes - using a class like this is a compromise. It's annoying to have to create the class in the first place and only you can decide whether it is worth the effort. However if the calling code is very complex and the null checks are really making it difficult to follow the logic, then having a separate utils class just to hide the null checks may be less effort in the long run.

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