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We need an application, in release build we need assert and we would like to develop something like XXX_ASSERT but the problem is in MFC ASSERT can take any booleanExpression as an argument and evaluate this but if we write our custom assert e.g. MY_ASSERT than how to achieve that custom assert will evaluate any booleanExpression.

#include<afxwin.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
void abort()
{
    AfxMessageBox(_T("Test"));
}
#define MY_ASSERT(BoolCondition) do { if (!(BoolCondition)) { abort(); } } while (0)
class CAge:public CObject
{
public:
    int m_nAge;
    CAge(int age)
    {
        m_nAge = age;
    }
};
class MyFrame:public CFrameWnd
{
public:
    MyFrame()
    {
        Create(0,_T("Hello"));
    }
    void OnPaint()
    {
        CPaintDC d(this);
        CBrush r;
        r.CreateSolidBrush(RGB(25,200,152));

        d.SelectObject(&r);
        d.Rectangle(100,100,250,250);
        r.DeleteObject();
        CAge *pAge;// = new CAge(21);
        MY_ASSERT(pAge);
    }
    DECLARE_MESSAGE_MAP()
};
BEGIN_MESSAGE_MAP(MyFrame, CFrameWnd)
    ON_WM_PAINT()
END_MESSAGE_MAP()
class MyApp:public CWinApp
{
    int InitInstance()
    {
        MyFrame *p = new MyFrame();
        p->ShowWindow(3);
        m_pMainWnd = p;
        return 1;
    }
};
MyApp a;
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1 Answer

The straighforward approach should work just fine for any Boolean expression:

#include <stdlib.h>
#define MY_ASSERT(BoolCondition) do { if (!(BoolCondition)) { abort(); } } while (0)
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1  
In MFC assert, argument can be anything like int or object of class but in MY_ASSERT which argument will be. It would be great if you provide me example. –  Mehul Donga Oct 11 '12 at 8:56
1  
@MehulDonga This macro will work with any int, and it will work with any class that has any kind of implicit conversion to bool. I can not imagine the MFC assert to work with any class that is not prepared to be tested? –  Seg Fault Oct 11 '12 at 10:15
1  
@ChristianRau That's standard best-practice for macros so that you can use them in any context, for example within an if. To see why it is necessary, put the assert in the if and give the if an else. –  Seg Fault Oct 11 '12 at 10:17
1  
@ChristianRau No, because then in some cases you would have to call/use the macro without the semikolon, for example within a double-nested if. –  Seg Fault Oct 11 '12 at 10:38
1  
@MehulDonga That's weird, the standard C assert doesn't work in release, but abort should always work, and this self-written macro too. –  Seg Fault Oct 12 '12 at 5:15
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