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Here's what I have:

import csv

a=8   
print a    
mylist = [a,'2','3']    
myfile = open("myfile.csv", "wb") # csv files should always be opened in binary mode 
wr = csv.writer(myfile, quoting=csv.QUOTE_ALL)    
wr.writerow(mylist)    
a = a + 1    
print a    
wr.writerow(mylist)

The result of the prints are 8 and 9, just as I would expect. When I open the file I created I have the result:

"8","2","3"     
"8","2","3"

The top row is what I would expect, but the second row starts with "8" rather than "9". I understand I can work around this by inserting mylist = [a,'2','3'] again after I redefine the variable, but would someone mind explaining to me why I have to reinsert the list line or why the variable isn't automatically updated in the list? Is there another approach I can use to avoid having to reinsert the list line each time I want to update a variable?

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1  
@Tichodroma - I believe you edited my post to improve the formatting. Thank you for doing so. May I ask where I should go for formatting guidelines so that my work doesn't need to be cleaned in the future? –  philq02 Oct 11 '12 at 8:36
    
Sure, take a look at stackoverflow.com/editing-help –  user647772 Oct 11 '12 at 8:38
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is the line:

a = a + 1

in which you reassigned a to a new integer, which is not connected to its previous value.

Anyway, integers are immutable variables and you cannot do anything else with it than reassign.

As @thg435 comments, list operation some_list = some_list + [5] would have the same effect. However, lists are mutable objects and you can use some_list.append(5), which would modify the list and reflect its changes into the csv file.

If you work with mutable objects (list, dict), you can modify their values:

import csv
a=8   
mylist = [a,'2','3']    
with open("myfile.csv", "wb") as myfile:
    wr = csv.writer(myfile, quoting=csv.QUOTE_ALL)    
    wr.writerow(mylist)    
    mylist[0] = mylist[0] + 1  ####  here you modify a list
    wr.writerow(mylist)
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Immutability is irrelevant here. some_list = some_list + [5] would have exactly the same effect. –  gdbdmdb Oct 11 '12 at 8:12
    
@eumiro - Thank you for the information. –  philq02 Oct 11 '12 at 8:37
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Consider

a = 1
mylist = [a,2,3]
print mylist # [1,2,3]

mylist is a structure with three elements, first of which points to the variable a which has the value 1

----------       -------------
| mylist | --->  |   |  2|  3|
----------       -------------
                   |
                   v   
                 -----      -----
                 | a | ---> | 1 |
                 -----      -----

Now let's change a:

   a = a + 1
   print mylist # still [1,2,3]

We've created a new variable and gave it the name a, thus revoking that name from the first variable.The first element of the list still points to the first (now unnamed) variable. These two variables are not related in any way.

----------       -------------
| mylist | --->  |   |  2|  3|
----------       -------------
                   |
                   v   
                 -----      -----
                 | ? | ---> | 1 |
                 -----      -----

-----      -----
| a | ---> | 2 |
-----      -----
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