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I expected the first example code produces the result same as the second one but it didn't. So in order to get the correct class name, I have to redefine the custom msg() method in the extended class.

I'd like to know why the first one does not produce the extended class name and why it does when the method is redefined which is exactly the same.

Example 1

call_user_func(array(new MyClass_Mod, "msg"));

class MyClass {
    function msg() {
        echo '<p>get_class(): ' . get_class() . '</p>';
    }
}
class MyClass_Mod extends MyClass {
}

output

get_class(): MyClass

Example 2

call_user_func(array(new MyClass_Mod, "msg"));

class MyClass {
    function msg() {
        echo '<p>get_class(): ' . get_class() . '</p>';
    }
}
class MyClass_Mod extends MyClass {
    function msg() {
        echo '<p>get_class(): ' . get_class() . '</p>';
    }
}

output

get_class(): MyClass_Mod

I'd like to know the mechanism, so please do not suggest to use get_called_class(). I'm not able to use it for the version below PHP 5.3. Thanks for your input.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You just have to pass $this argument to get_class function.

get_class($this);
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wao............ –  Teno Oct 11 '12 at 8:18
    
@Teno: It's a good idea to read the documentation for functions you call in your code. –  Jon Oct 11 '12 at 8:19
    
@Jon I did and actually it says This parameter may be omitted when inside a class. So I would expect it can be omitted. –  Teno Oct 11 '12 at 8:20
    
@Teno: Read the "return values" section as well. :) –  Jon Oct 11 '12 at 8:24
1  
@Teno It basically means the class that defined that function. In your case it's parent class MyClass –  Rezigned Oct 11 '12 at 8:27

If the parameter of get_class is omitted when inside a class, the name of that class is returned.

You need to specify the parameter with $this.

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Does the name of that class mean the original class? –  Teno Oct 11 '12 at 8:23
    
@Teno It means the class that defined that function. In your case it's parent class –  Rezigned Oct 11 '12 at 8:25
1  
@Rezigned Oh, really. It's quite confusing. –  Teno Oct 11 '12 at 8:27

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