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I'm writing a .hpp file for a class that should receive a function as one of it's parameters and store it in a member variable, so far my code looks like this:

template<typename Function> class myClass
{
  public:
           myClass(Function function) : pvFunction( function ) {}

           //Functor operator
           double operator() (double x) const{
             return pvFunction(x+4);
           }
  private:
           Function pvFunction
}

The program looks pointless because it is, the values it returns are not important for now. I'm simply trying to figure out how to pass a function to this class and use its functor operator. The only problems are:

1) I don't know if this class definition is correct, meaning is this the proper way of accepting any type of function to be passed as a parameter to an object of this class.

2) how do I create an instance of this class in my program? how do I pass the function to the new object and then call it?

Been at this for quite some time and can't seem to figure it out

EDIT:

in my program file, main.cpp, this code receives an error:

double function(double);

int main()
{
   myClass<double> myClassObject((function));
   return 0;
}

double function(double x)
{
   return (x+3.0);
}
share|improve this question
    
Have a look at the implementation of boost::function<> for inspiration. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Oct 11 '12 at 8:34
    
Do you really mean "any type" or "any type matching a certain parameter type list and return type"? –  juanchopanza Oct 11 '12 at 8:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1) Yes it is.

2) The Type of myClassObject from your example should be

 myClass<double(*)(double)> myClassObject(function);

since function is of type double(*)(double). The best way to construct objects of such a template, is to use a function template like this:

template<typename Function>
myClass<Function> MakeMyClass(Function f)
{
    return myClass<Function>(f);
}


int main()
{
   auto withFuncPtr= MakeMyClass(function);
   auto withLambda= MakeMyClass([] (double v) {return v*2;});

   Foo foo;
   auto withStdFunction = MakeMyClass(
       std::bind(&Foo::Method, &foo, std::placeholders::_1));
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This was exactly what I needed, Thank you very much –  kjh Oct 11 '12 at 8:42

You get an error because the class expects the template parameter to be the actual function type, but you pass the template parameter as double in the instantiation.

Consider to use the new functionality of C++11 like std::function.

template<typename T>
struct myClass
{
    typedef std::function<T(T)> func_type;

    func_type pvFunction;

    myClass(func_type func) : pvFunction(func) {}

    T operator()(T x)
        { return pvFunction(x + 4); }
};

double function(double x)
{
    return (x+3.0);
}

int main()
{
    myClass<double> my_class(function);
    std::cout << "my_class(3) = " << my_class(3) << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
    
interesting, this would definitely be more convenient –  kjh Oct 11 '12 at 8:47

You can use struct with operator() as suggestion

template<typename Function> class myClass
{
  public:
        myClass(){}

        //Functor operator
        double operator() (double x) const
        {
          return pvFunction(x+4);
        }
  private:
        Function pvFunction;
};

struct Double
{
    double operator()(const double n)const
    {
        return n;
    }
};

int main() {
    myClass<Double> myClassObject;
    std::cout<<myClassObject(2.0f);
    return 0;
}

Prints 6

share|improve this answer

I'm really not sure what you want to achieve, since how can you use any function if you still want to bind it to having an argument type of double, but, the example below makes your example template work, but i really don't see the use.

    template<typename Function> class myClass
    {
    public:
        myClass(Function function) : pvFunction( function ) {}

        //Functor operator
        double operator() (double x) const{
            return pvFunction(x+4);
        }
    private:
        Function pvFunction;
    };

    double foo1(double x)
    {
        return x;
    }

    double foo2(double x)
    {
        return x + 1;
    }
    int main(int argc, char** argv)
    {
        myClass<double(*)(double)> instance1(foo1);
        myClass<double(*)(double)> instance2(foo2);
        double a = instance1(1.5), b = instance2(1.5);
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Eventually this will become a derivative class, but I need to be able to store the function to derive first. I didn't want people giving suggestions for how to implement a class that takes the derivative of a function so I left that tidbit of info out. –  kjh Oct 11 '12 at 9:38

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