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I'm currently backing up my current setup to move over to some new hardware and was wondering what other developers think of first when given a fresh OS installation.

Please answer one item per answer so they can be voted on independently.

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closed as not constructive by Bill the Lizard Dec 20 '11 at 20:12

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Which OS? Because different OSes use different folders and data in various folders... Specify by tags. –  Robert Koritnik Sep 10 '09 at 14:18
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A bounty on a wiki question? Do we do that, now? –  Stobor Sep 11 '09 at 4:50
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It is perhaps more vexing that there is a bounty on a question that barely belongs on this site; sounds more "superuser" if anything... –  Marc Gravell Sep 11 '09 at 22:44
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Belongss on SuperUser. Can't migrate because of the bounty. –  MiffTheFox Sep 13 '09 at 5:52

57 Answers 57

up vote 24 down vote accepted
+100

My home directory.

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In particular, my ~/.ssh directory –  Jherico Aug 16 '09 at 6:11

Setting decent Windows Explorer settings:

  • details view,
  • show extensions,
  • show all hidden and system files,
  • open new instances in new process,
  • etc. etc. etc. ;-)

(Those defaults probably make perfect sense for "average users", but we all know that users of stackoverflow.com do not fall into that large bucket.)

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Doh! This is the very first thing indeed! :D –  Andrejs Cainikovs Sep 8 '09 at 18:47
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This happens even before drivers get installed. Seems so little yet makes such an improvement on usability. –  Brian Surowiec Sep 10 '09 at 14:31

Outlook's personal.pst

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My Pictures, then install svn and get the rest.

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My collection of utilities/tools/editors (regardless of which OS)..

Like the stuff listed here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/173328/whats-in-your-utility-toolkit

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for me, i will backup my /storage because i store everything on it such as my softwares,development tools,tutorials,documentations,etc..

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Since Windows 7 fetches all my device drivers at installation, the only thing I do today is load my user directory backup and voila.

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I copy nothing over, I keep everything in subversion and simply do a get

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The porn and other naughty images would be my first suggestion but those I keep on an external disk so no need to copy those. :-)

My emails, perhaps? But no, I use webmail mostly with online archives so no need to copy those.

Most other important data that I have is also stored on external disks so I actually don't have to copy anything from my old to my new system. All I need to do is install all the applications I use on the new system.

So, technically speaking, I would "copy" all applications I use, by installing them on the new system.

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~/.bashrc
~/.vimrc
~/.gnupg
~/.ssh
Keypass files
OpenVPN key & config file

That's all I need to get my work done. My bookmarks are handled by Xmarks now, so I just set that up in Firefox and all my stuff magically returns. I have backups of my work home dir on JungleDisk, I don't need that stuff immediately but it's there.

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My wamp folder with my dev environment and in-progress work and my PortableApps folder with 90% of the applications I need for dev work. The rest is icing...

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I've never shared the machine I work on with other people, so I'm used to completely owning it - I customize it as I want, I have root (Administrator) access on it, I configure all the drives and partitions, etc.

As such, I always have system and data on separate partitions. Even when I reinstall the OS, I can do it easily and just format the system partition without copying anything anywhere.

So, if I migrated to a new system, it wouldn't be as much my home directory that I copy, but rather my home partition.

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all those free ebooks which I have collected over the years

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Agree'd with quicksilver, then it would be my keychain backup.

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For me its strange that we have to do this every time from one h/w to another, manually. That there is no tool or software* to do such stuff. Something that could copy something (My Thunderbird Mailbox) to another version of the OS if needed (XP to XP or XP to Vista), and also know whether such a move would work (compatibility,...)

*AFAIK, for Windows. And only nLite was mentioned, but this not a migration tool as such. I have not tried the Migration Assistant on Mac OSX, so I don't know how effective this is - does it copy third party app's preferences, data etc effectively?

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I generally would have messed up my system in a year or two with all my files scattered here and there. What I generally do is copy all my data to the new system under a "Files from older installation" folder. This assures me that I have all my files and avoids the painstaking process of filtering out actual useful data. Also, I'm up and running in no time.

As and when I need files from my older installation, I move the required files out to a more organized location. But then again, this "organized way of keeping files" wont last... :-)

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My TrueCrypt file filled with passwords.

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You just lost your plausible deniability. –  Ryan Thompson Oct 22 '09 at 7:10

Using WHS for backups, having access to the old backup (and the ability to mount+browse the old computer's file structure completely) has been invaluable. You'll always forget something.

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I use Mozy, so I just download the client and grab everything off of that. Very simple.

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My VMWare virtual machines. :)

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The first thing I copy is the Mac OS X keychain so that I don't have to re-enter all of my passwords for wlan or sites that I don't remember the user/password combinations anymore.

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New hardware means windows ( at least in my country ), so the first thing I do is to install a more user friendly OS ( Slackware, Backtrack, Ubuntu - you name it! ).

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First you must have all your hardware drivers.

Second: Most Used Apps: Antivirus and/or Firewall IDEs Compilers Offices (MS or OpenOffice) Image Editors Media Player CD burners

...etc etc...

Third: Your data.

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On Windows, my favourite sysinternals tools

Mainly Process Explorer and Autoruns

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Ultimately I just love the perceived speed and efficiency of a clean slate.

What I have is a 'downloads' folder that contains every app I ever installed and kept.

This is ported over to the new installation and get installed as i use them. I never save configurations and my music etc is all backed up on an external drive keeping the OS installation relatively painless.

Most important is to copy my Battlezone 2 folder now I lost the CD.

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.zshrc or .bashrc
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I rather try to not install fresh OS but copy my pre-configured partition image with all programs, settings and security stuff already in place. And then i copy recent projects/source code/recent home dir to it.

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my home directory, followed by /usr/local/bin (where i put small scripts, rather than adding something else to everyone's path)

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an imaging software to create an image.

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