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How to convert std::chrono::time_point to calendar datetime string with fractional seconds? For example: "10-10-2012 12:38:40.123456".

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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

If system_clock, this class have time_t conversion.

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

using namespace std::chrono;

int main()
{
  system_clock::time_point p = system_clock::now();

  std::time_t t = system_clock::to_time_t(p);
  std::cout << std::ctime(&t) << std::endl; // for example : Tue Sep 27 14:21:13 2011
}

EDIT: But, time_t is not contain fractional seconds. Alternative way use time_point::time_since_epoch() function. This function return duration from epoch. Follow example is milli second resolution's fractional.

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

using namespace std::chrono;

int main()
{
  high_resolution_clock::time_point p = high_resolution_clock::now();

  milliseconds ms = duration_cast<milliseconds>(p.time_since_epoch());

  seconds s = duration_cast<seconds>(ms);
  std::time_t t = s.count();
  std::size_t fractional_seconds = ms.count() % 1000;

  std::cout << std::ctime(&t) << std::endl;
  std::cout << fractional_seconds << std::endl;
}

example result:

Thu Oct 11 19:10:24 2012

925
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And, how to add to the output string the fractional seconds? –  PaperBirdMaster Oct 11 '12 at 9:42
    
time_t is not contain fractional seconds. I add more sample code. –  Akira Takahashi Oct 11 '12 at 10:15
    
Thanks! now the answers is better and closer to what the op was asking. –  PaperBirdMaster Oct 11 '12 at 10:18

This worked for me for a format like YYYY.MM.DD-HH.MM.SS.fff. Attempting to make this code capable of accepting any string format will be like reinventing the wheel (i.e. there are functions for all this in Boost.

std::chrono::system_clock::time_point string_to_time_point(const std::string &str)
{
    using namespace std;
    using namespace std::chrono;

    int yyyy, mm, dd, HH, MM, SS, fff;

    char scanf_format[] = "%4d.%2d.%2d-%2d.%2d.%2d.%3d";

    sscanf(str.c_str(), scanf_format, &yyyy, &mm, &dd, &HH, &MM, &SS, &fff);

    tm ttm = tm();
    ttm.tm_year = yyyy - 1900; // Year since 1900
    ttm.tm_mon = mm - 1; // Month since January 
    ttm.tm_mday = dd; // Day of the month [1-31]
    ttm.tm_hour = HH; // Hour of the day [00-23]
    ttm.tm_min = MM;
    ttm.tm_sec = SS;

    time_t ttime_t = mktime(&ttm);

    system_clock::time_point time_point_result = std::chrono::system_clock::from_time_t(ttime_t);

    time_point_result += std::chrono::milliseconds(fff);
    return time_point_result;
}

std::string time_point_to_string(std::chrono::system_clock::time_point &tp)
{
    using namespace std;
    using namespace std::chrono;

    auto ttime_t = system_clock::to_time_t(tp);
    auto tp_sec = system_clock::from_time_t(ttime_t);
    milliseconds ms = duration_cast<milliseconds>(tp - tp_sec);

    std::tm * ttm = localtime(&ttime_t);

    char date_time_format[] = "%Y.%m.%d-%H.%M.%S";

    char time_str[] = "yyyy.mm.dd.HH-MM.SS.fff";

    strftime(time_str, strlen(time_str), date_time_format, ttm);

    string result(time_str);
    result.append(".");
    result.append(to_string(ms.count()));

    return result;
}
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Self-explanatory code follows which first creates a std::tm corresponding to 10-10-2012 12:38:40, converts that to a std::chrono::system_clock::time_point, adds 0.123456 seconds, and then prints that out by converting back to a std::tm. How to handle the fractional seconds is in the very last step.

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <ctime>

int main()
{
    // Create 10-10-2012 12:38:40 UTC as a std::tm
    std::tm tm = {0};
    tm.tm_sec = 40;
    tm.tm_min = 38;
    tm.tm_hour = 12;
    tm.tm_mday = 10;
    tm.tm_mon = 9;
    tm.tm_year = 112;
    tm.tm_isdst = -1;
    // Convert std::tm to std::time_t (popular extension)
    std::time_t tt = timegm(&tm);
    // Convert std::time_t to std::chrono::system_clock::time_point
    std::chrono::system_clock::time_point tp = 
                                     std::chrono::system_clock::from_time_t(tt);
    // Add 0.123456 seconds
    // This will not compile if std::chrono::system_clock::time_point has
    //   courser resolution than microseconds
    tp += std::chrono::microseconds(123456);

    // Now output tp

    // Convert std::chrono::system_clock::time_point to std::time_t
    tt = std::chrono::system_clock::to_time_t(tp);
    // Convert std::time_t to std::tm (popular extension)
    tm = std::tm{0};
    gmtime_r(&tt, &tm);
    // Output month
    std::cout << tm.tm_mon + 1 << '-';
    // Output day
    std::cout << tm.tm_mday << '-';
    // Output year
    std::cout << tm.tm_year+1900 << ' ';
    // Output hour
    if (tm.tm_hour <= 9)
        std::cout << '0';
    std::cout << tm.tm_hour << ':';
    // Output minute
    if (tm.tm_min <= 9)
        std::cout << '0';
    std::cout << tm.tm_min << ':';
    // Output seconds with fraction
    //   This is the heart of the question/answer.
    //   First create a double-based second
    std::chrono::duration<double> sec = tp - 
                                    std::chrono::system_clock::from_time_t(tt) +
                                    std::chrono::seconds(tm.tm_sec);
    //   Then print out that double using whatever format you prefer.
    if (sec.count() < 10)
        std::cout << '0';
    std::cout << std::fixed << sec.count() << '\n';
}

For me this outputs:

10-10-2012 12:38:40.123456

Your std::chrono::system_clock::time_point may or may not be precise enough to hold microseconds.

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In general, you can't do this in any straightforward fashion. time_point is essentially just a duration from a clock-specific epoch.

If you have a std::chrono::system_clock::time_point, then you can use std::chrono::system_clock::to_time_t to convert the time_point to a time_t, and then use the normal C functions such as ctime or strftime to format it.

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