Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am stuck with this problem while compiling my static class library.

I know that Boost doesn't officially support VS2012 but since this is my current development environment, I could really use some advice.

I have been searching around but nothing so far has helped me.

Sample code:

Foo.h:

#include "FooImpl.h"
#include <boost/serialization/serialization.hpp>
#include <boost/serialization/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/archive/text_iarchive.hpp>
#include <boost/archive/text_oarchive.hpp>

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo(void) : pImpl(std::make_shared<FooImpl>()) {}
    //similar constructors follow

    //a few get methods here
private:
    std::shared_ptr<FooImpl> pImpl;

    friend class boost::serialization::access;
    template <typename Archive>
    void serialize(Archive & ar, const unsigned int file_version);
}

Foo.cpp:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "Foo.h"

template<class Archive>
void Foo::serialize(Archive& ar, const unsigned int ver) 
{  
    ar & pImpl;
}

template void Foo::serialize<boost::archive::text_iarchive>(
    boost::archive::text_iarchive & ar, 
    const unsigned int file_version
);
template void Foo::serialize<boost::archive::text_oarchive>(
    boost::archive::text_oarchive & ar, 
    const unsigned int file_version
);

FooImpl.h:

#include <boost/serialization/serialization.hpp>
#include <boost/serialization/string.hpp>

class FooImpl
{
public:
    FooImpl(void);
    //other constructors, get methods

private:
    //data members - unsigned int & std::wstring

    friend class boost::serialization::access;
    template <typename Archive>
    void serialize(Archive& ar, const unsigned int ver);
};

FooImpl.cpp:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "FooImpl.h"

//function implementations

template <typename Archive>
void FooImpl::serialize(Archive& ar, const unsigned int ver)
{
    ar & id_;
    ar & code_;
}

//Later added, serialization requires these

template void FooImpl::serialize<boost::archive::text_iarchive>(
    boost::archive::text_iarchive & ar, 
    const unsigned int file_version
);

template void FooImpl::serialize<boost::archive::text_oarchive>(
    boost::archive::text_oarchive & ar, 
    const unsigned int file_version
);
share|improve this question
    
What line of code gives the error? Also, shouldn't ar & pImpl; be ar & (*pImpl);? (pImpl is a pointer.) –  David Schwartz Oct 11 '12 at 8:57
    
@David Schwartz It compiles now but it seems this is not the solution. Whenever I try to serialize a shared_ptr holding the foo in my main method, I get the same error there. –  jt234 Oct 11 '12 at 9:55
    
What do you mean by the "same error"? The error you described is a compiler error and you say it compiles now. –  David Schwartz Oct 11 '12 at 10:00
    
I use the static library in another project, which won't compile trying to serialize the shared pointer. –  jt234 Oct 11 '12 at 10:15
    
Can you paste the code that doesn't compile? –  David Schwartz Oct 11 '12 at 10:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are trying to serialize pointers. You want to serialize the thing the pointer points to. The simplest way is to replace foo << ptr; with foo << (*ptr);.

The parentheses around *ptr are not necessary and many would see them as a sign of clumsiness. But if you find they make things clearer for you, use them.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't the whole point of the boost serialization library that it can serialize pointers intelligently? Otherwise what is the point of boost/serialization/shared_ptr.hpp? –  Arman Sep 28 '13 at 23:38
    
@ausairman It's just a matter or what behavior you expect. –  David Schwartz Sep 29 '13 at 0:05

boost::serialization is an extensible that can extended to work with any types, so you can implement your own version of load/save for std::shared_ptr, take a look at boost_installation_path/boost/serialization/shared_ptr.hpp and implement your own load/save from it. As another workaround you can use boost::shared_ptr in place of std::shared_ptr!! since you are using boost I see no advantage of using std::shared_ptr over boost::shared_ptr

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.