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I have written a Perl wrapper around a shell script. I am using IPC::Run::Simple to execute system commands. As an example:

run ("mkdir ~$usr/12.2.0_cp/faiz_cpv/$pdate") or die "Error $ERR";
run ("cp ~$usr/12.2.0_cp/faiz_cpv/MPlist.lst ~$usr/12.2.0_cp/faiz_cpv/$pdate") || die "Error: $ERR";
run ("cd ~$usr/12.2.0_cp/faiz_cpv/$pdate; sh /opsutils/mfg_top/rel/CPV/bin/list_generation.sh . MPlist.lst mfg_relall_us\@oracle.com") or die "error $ERR";
.
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One of these shell scripts requires the user of the script to enter their password. That is, a message is printed on stdout and the password is accepted via the shell. A number of calls are made to this shell script during the entire process which means a user must reenter his password a number of times.

Is there a way by which I can request user for the password at the command line itself, and pass that password implicitly instead of prompting user for the password again and again?

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You should go for IPC::Open3 or something similar as you basically need to use some two-way communication between your spawned commands and your script. –  Ouki Oct 11 '12 at 10:11
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Perl has mkdir built in and File::Copy provides a copy routine. Its generally safer and faster to use them than shelling out. Though it will not translate ~ for you. –  Schwern Oct 11 '12 at 10:12
    
You may need to investigate the Expect module if you really must run external programs that prompt you for passwords, etc. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 11 '12 at 12:31
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1 Answer

Perl has mkdir and chdir built in and File::Copy provides a copy routine. Its generally safer and faster to use them than shelling out. Though it will not translate ~ for you. File::chdir makes changing a directory and running a command a little safer.

For the rest, use the full IPC::Run to control interacting with your program and Term::ReadLine::Gnu to read the password without displaying it. Sorry this is just a sketch and not a full answer.

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