Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for a fast and efficient way to populate a co-occurrence matrix(so as to say). Here is a sample of the data I am working with:

col1 col2
a e    
a f    
a e    
b f    
c g    
a e    
d f    
a e    
a g    
b e    
c e

And I want a matrix of the following form:

... e...  f...  g    
a    
b    
c    
d

with the corresponding entry relating to the frequency.

For example, element (3,1) in the matrix would correspond to frequency of the co-occurrence of (c,e) and should have a value of 1 and that of (1,1) should have a value 3 corresponding to 3 entries of (a,e) in the dataset.

I am currently individually calculating the items using two for loops and it takes an extremely long time to compute the matrix (the actual data has about a million rows).

share|improve this question
2  
sparse matrixes can give you a clue, especially they conversion to non-sparse –  Andrey Oct 11 '12 at 9:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use sparse to do exactly what you need:

spA = sparse(data(:,1), data(:,2), 1);

where data is your data, but as numbers. So you first have to convert alphabetic characters to doubles.

Sparse assembles row/column pairs from data(:,1) and data(:,2) adding 1 for every occurance of a pair. Note however that if you expect the matrix to be symmetric, you might need to sum spA and its transpose, depending on your data.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Genius. Small comment though: sparse converts the datatype automagically; no need for manual conversion. –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 11 '12 at 11:03
    
@RodyOldenhuis it does indeed. But since a is 97, the sparse matrix will have empty beginning and only really start at row/column 97. –  angainor Oct 11 '12 at 11:11
    
Thank you all for your help. –  user1737564 Oct 13 '12 at 20:08

This is a solution in R with table:

df <- read.table(text="col1 col2
a e    
a f    
a e    
b f    
c g    
a e    
d f    
a e    
a g    
b e    
c e", header = TRUE)

table(df)

    col2
col1 e f g
   a 4 1 1
   b 1 1 0
   c 1 0 1
   d 0 1 0
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.