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At the moment, TypeScript does not allow use get/set methods(accessors) in interfaces. For example:

interface I {
      get name():string;
}

class C implements I {
      get name():string {
          return null;
      } 
}

furthermore, TypeScript does not allow use Array Function Expression in class methods: for ex.:

class C {
    private _name:string;

    get name():string => this._name;
}

Is there any other way I can use a getter and setter on an interface definition?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can specify the property on the interface, but you can't enforce whether getters and setters are used, like this:

interface IExample {
    Name: string;
}

class Example implements IExample {
    private _name: string = "Bob";

    public get Name() {
        return this._name;
    }

    public set Name(value) {
        this._name = value;
    }
}

var example = new Example();
alert(example.Name);

In this example, the interface doesn't force the class to use getters and setters, I could have used a property instead (example below) - but the interface is supposed to hide these implementation details anyway as it is a promise to the calling code about what it can call.

interface IExample {
    Name: string;
}

class Example implements IExample {
    // this satisfies the interface just the same
    public Name: string = "Bob";
}

var example = new Example();
alert(example.Name);

And lastly, => is not allowed for class methods - you could start a discussion on Codeplex if you think there is a burning use case for it. Here is an example:

class Test {
    // Yes
    getName = () => 'Steve';

    // No
    getName() => 'Steve';

    // No
    get name() => 'Steve';
}
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You can use => for defining class methods like this: name = (a: string) => this._name; but in the output JS it will be defined inside the class function rather than extending its prototype object. –  orad Aug 18 '13 at 2:09

First of all, Typescript only supports get and set syntax when targetting Ecmascript 5. To achieve this, you have to call the compiler with

tsc --target ES5

Interfaces do not support getters and setters. To get your code to compile you would have to change it to

interface I { 
    getName():string;
}

class C implements I { 
    getName():string {
          return null;
    }   
}

What typescript does support is a special syntax for fields in constructors. In your case, you could have

interface I {
    getName():string;
}

class C implements I {
    constructor(public name: string) {
    }
    getName():string {
        return name;
    }
}

Notice how class C does not specify the field name. It is actually declared using syntactic sugar public name: string in the constructor.

As Sohnee points out, the interface is actually supposed to hide any implementation details. In my example, I have chosen the interface to require a java-style getter method. However, you can also a property and then let the class decide how to implement the interface.

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You can use get and set keywords in TypeScript. –  Steve Fenton Oct 11 '12 at 12:07
    
Thanks. I've updated my answer. –  Valentin Oct 11 '12 at 12:08
    
A side note on ECMAScript 5 support - Object.defineProperty is supported in IE8+, FF4+, Opera 12+, WebKit and Safari. There is also an EC5 Shim at github.com/kriskowal/es5-shim –  Steve Fenton Oct 11 '12 at 12:18

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