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I'm building my first MVC 4/Razor web app using Entity Framework 5, and doing a bit of homework before making any design decisions.

I see that the EF objects descend from EntityObject, which appears to have a lot of useful best-practices stuff built it, not least of which is optimistic concurrency handling. In other words if 2 people load the record of Jane Doe of 123 Maple Street simultaneously, the first one changes her name to Jane Smith and the second one changes her address to 321 Maple Street, then it's very easy to allow both changes to be merged into the record without conflicts, while an attempt by a second user to modify the same field as the first user will result in an error.

On the other hand, it seems pretty standard practice to create lightweight Data Transfer Objects to pass data between the server and the client, and which serve as or in models for the MVC framework. This is great for ensuring minimal traffic to the client, but it screws up concurrency checking.

So I'm questioning the rationale for using DTOs. What are the reasons for using DTOs? How bad is it to use an EntityObject as or within a MVC model? What other solution would you propose to enable optimistic concurrency handling as I've described above?

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I'm curious about the concurrency handling...if you won't use EntityObject and instead you will be using your own models and then convert them/attach to object context, will you end with essentialy same concurrency handling? –  Bartosz Oct 11 '12 at 11:49
    
@Bartosz - using DTOs will mess up optimistic concurrency checking. You can still have concurrency protection by using a RowVersion field, but you won't be able to merge non-conflicting data automatically, as you could with an EntityObject. That's the reason for my question. –  Shaul Oct 11 '12 at 12:07
    
Aren't EF objects POCOs since a couple versions ago? I though if you wanted "EntityObject"s, you had to use some sort of adapter... If your model classes has EF related methods, then yes it's really bad to do so. But EF 5 shouldn't. Since I think 4.1, they use Proxies instead of extending EntityObject exactly for that reason - to make it a good practice to use them as Models. –  Pluc Oct 11 '12 at 12:12
    
@Pluc - sounds interesting. Do you have any links to back up your comments? If they are POCOs with no danger of dragging lazy-loaded related data through to the client, yet still preserving load values, then that would be first prize. –  Shaul Oct 11 '12 at 12:24
    
@Shaul - I dont. I would have posted this as an answer if I had links to back me up ;) However, just look at your .tt and generated .cs files. They are plain POCOs. No interfaces, no base classes. If you get a object from entity framework and check the object's type, you will find something like System.Data.Entity.DynamicProxies.Employee_5E43C6C196[...]. This is the class generated by the proxy. However, if you do the exact same thing but change the database context configuration before (dbContext.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;), you've earned yourself a nice Employee entity! –  Pluc Oct 11 '12 at 13:06
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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I only see bad points when passing an EntityObject directly to a view:

  • You need to do manual whitelisting or blacklisting to prevent over-posting and mass assignment
  • It becomes very easy to accidentally lazy load extra data from your view, resulting in select N+1 problems
  • In my personal opinion, a model should closely resembly the information displayed on the view and in most cases (except for basic CRUD stuff), a view contains information from more than one EntityObject
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So how would you recommend enabling optimistic concurrency checking as I've described without an EntityObject? –  Shaul Oct 11 '12 at 11:49
    
BTW, +1 for the note about accidentally lazy-loading extra data. That's burned me before. –  Shaul Oct 11 '12 at 11:51
    
To be honest, I've never had to deal with a concurrency situation where "Last wins" wasn't an allowed solution, so I don't really know how to implement some sort of optimistic concurrency when using DTO's. –  Kristof Claes Oct 11 '12 at 11:53
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=Posting comment as answer=

EF objects are POCOs since a couple versions ago (not sure which). If you want an "EntityObject", you have to use some sort of adapter (I beleive there is one to facilitate application migration, but I wouldn't recommend using it as part of a new project).

If your model classes has EF related methods, then yes it's really bad to do so. But EF 5 shouldn't. Since 4.1, I believe, they use Proxies instead of extending EntityObject exactly for that reason - to make it a good practice to use them as Models.

Just look at your .tt and generated .cs files. They are plain POCOs. No interfaces, no base classes. If you get an object from entity framework and check the object's type, you will find something like System.Data.Entity.DynamicProxies.Employee_5E43C6C196[...]. This is the class generated by the proxy. However, if you do the exact same thing but change the database context configuration before (dbContext.Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;), you've earned yourself a nice Employee entity!

So, to answer to original question, it is completly acceptable / good practice to use EF POCOs as Models but make sure you use them as non-persistent objects.

Additional information

You should consider DDD concepts and the implementation of a DDD complient paterns such as repositories or anything you feel comfertable using.

You should never use those entities directly in views, persistent or none-persistent.

You should read about AutoMapper to make your life easier (goes nicely with repositories or stand-alone). It will facilitate the transfer from ProxyEmployee -> Employee -> ViewModel and the opposite.

Example of horrible usage of EF entities:

return View(dbContext.employees.First());

Example of bad #1 usage of EF entities:

Employee e = dbContext.employees.First();
return View(new Employee { name = e.name, [...] });

Example of bad #2 usage of EF entities:

Employee e = dbContext.employees.First();
return View(new EmployeeViewModel{ employee = e });

Example of ok usage of EF entities:

Employee dbEmploye = dbContext.employees.First();
Employee e = new Employee { name = dbEmploye.name, [...] };
return View(new EmployeeViewModel { employee = e });

Example of good usage of EF entities:

Employee e = dbContext.employees.First();
EmployeeViewModel evm = Mapper.Map<Employee, EmployeeViewModel>(e);
return View(evm);

Example of awesome usage of EF entities:

Employee e = employeRepository.GetFirstEmployee();
EmployeeViewModel evm = Mapper.Map<Employee, EmployeeViewModel>(e);
return View(evm);

How Chuck Norris would do it:

return View(EmployeeViewModel.Build(employeRepository.GetFirstEmployee()));
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Will you flag me if I say +1 for Chuck Norris? If so, then I say +1 for whole answer (it's what I tend to do, anyway) :) –  Bartosz Oct 11 '12 at 13:48
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Chuck Norris made you do it. (PS. I like how Shaul edited my post to fix my typo in Chuck Norris spelling) –  Pluc Oct 11 '12 at 16:58
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On the other hand, it seems pretty standard practice to create lightweight Data Transfer Objects to pass data between the server and the client, and which serve as or in models for the MVC framework. This is great for ensuring minimal traffic to the client, but it screws up concurrency checking

Here, you seem to be talking about what flows over the wire to the browser. In this sense, even if you use EntityObject classes in your controller, the data still has to be rendered to the client and posted back in a more basic form. So any concurrency support is not really relevant once you are on the client.

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But if you send load values through to the client and back again (as you would if you send through an EntityObject, you can still get the benefit of optimistic concurrency checking. That's what I'm gunning for. –  Shaul Oct 11 '12 at 11:48
    
No, as typically the context is only open for the duration of the web request, so when the client postbacks, it will be a new DB context, unless you are proposing some kind of session management? –  Justin Harvey Oct 11 '12 at 12:08
    
EntityObjects implicitly contain load values, don't they? Or is my premise fundamentally wrong? –  Shaul Oct 11 '12 at 12:09
    
Yes, you are right there, but that state is not maintained between one web request and the next. –  Justin Harvey Oct 11 '12 at 12:19
    
But if you were to pass an EntityObject to the client, then update it in the browser and send the same EntityObject back to the server and reattach it, would it not preserve the load values? –  Shaul Oct 11 '12 at 12:21
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Dtos have several advantages but depends on what you are planning.

If you design them to be flat then they are better and easier for the following:

  • mapping to view models
  • caching these dto objects as your domain objects might have a large graph and not great for putting in cache. Dtos can give you good granularity for what and how it is cached
  • simplifying api signatures and preventing unexpected late loading of proxied objects
  • sending data over the wire, read the about the stripper pattern

But if you have no need of any of this then you might just do without.

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On the basis that all answers so far seem to indicate that:

  • it's bad practice to push EntityObjects through to the client, a major reason being because you run the risk of accidentally lazy loading an untold amount of related data
  • DTOs mess up your ability to do optimistic concurrency checking

I will offer my own solution, and invite your comments on whether you think it's a good idea.

Instead of passing a plain vanilla DTO up to the client, we create an abstract GenericDTO<T> class, where T represents an EntityObject. We also create a GenericDTOProperty<T> class, which has two properties:

public class GenericDTOProperty<T> {
  public T LoadValue { get; internal set; }
  public T Value { get; set; }
}

Now, let's say I have an EntityObject called "Customer", with properties for "ID" and "Name". I would create a DTO class like this:

public class CustomerDTO : GenericDTO<Customer> {
  public GenericDTOProperty<int> ID;
  public GenericDTOProperty<string> Name;
}

Without getting into too much speculative code here, I would encapsulate code in the GenericDTO class that uses reflection to copy values to and from the EntityObject, setting the LoadValue when loading, and validating that it hasn't changed when saving. You can get even cleverer and put the ID property in the base class, if you're sure that every table will have a single ID field.

Does this seem like a reasonable pattern? It seems simple enough - almost too simple... which makes me concerned that maybe there's something wrong with it, otherwise it should be practically part of the framework?

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This approach implies that (when using ASP.NET MVC), you will need to add the LoadValues to hidden fields and then use a custom modelbinder to map incoming values to LoadValues and Values when posting the form. This might turn out to be more complicated then you would initially think. –  Kristof Claes Oct 11 '12 at 13:45
    
@KristofClaes - fair comment. Can you suggest any improvements on the design? Or a totally different alternative that will achieve what I'm gunning for, more efficiently? –  Shaul Oct 11 '12 at 13:52
    
Not from the top of my head. It's a tricky subject with a lot of not so apparent pitfalls. –  Kristof Claes Oct 11 '12 at 13:55
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