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I guess there isn't necessarily a 'right' answer to this, perhaps it's more a question of style but I often find myself wondering how to structure try/catch blocks.

For example take the two methods outlined in my hypothetical piece of code below (purely illustrative), I have a method that throws exceptions that I call multiple times but require different handling depending on which call it is. Similarly there could be different types of exception thrown with different handlers.

private Object exceptionMethod() throws Exception {
    throw new Exception("Something bad happened");
}

public void useMethodSequentialHandlers() {
    Object o1; // Must be declared in a wider scope than where it is used
    try {
        o1 = exceptionMethod();
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        // Assume we cannot continue after this exception so we'll return or
        // rethrow to exit the method
        return;
    }

    Object o2; // Must be declared in a wider scope than where it is used
    // Do something that requires o1
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        try {
            o2 = exceptionMethod();
            // Here we would use the objects in some manner
            boolean equal = o1.equals(o2);// Just a pointless example
                                                // to show that both objects
                                                // are required
                // Assume the method does a load of stuff down here
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            // Assume we can continue to the next iteration after this exception
            continue;
        }
    }
}

As I see it the advantage of having the try/catch blocks in a sequential order is that it is clearer to the reader exactly at what point I'm responding to the exception so perhaps there is better code clarity. The disadvantages would be that we have exception handling littered around various places in the method and we have variables declared in a wider scope than required (is this a bad thing?).

Alternatively:

public void useMethodNestedHandlers() {
    try {
        Object o1 = exceptionMethod(); // Can be declared inside scope where it is used
        // Do something that requires o1
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            try {
                Object o2 = exceptionMethod(); // Can be declared inside scope where it is used
                // Here we would use the objects in some manner
                boolean equal = o1.equals(o2); // Just a pointless example
                                                // to show that both objects
                                                // are required
                // Assume the method does a load of stuff down here
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                // Assume we can continue to the next iteration after this
                // exception
                continue;
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        // Assume we cannot continue after this exception so we'll return or
        // rethrow to exit the method
        return;
    }
}

Here we keep exception handling logic together and variables are declared within the scope they're used. However to me the exception handling logic seems less clear as it is further from it's point of origin. Does anyone have an opinion on which would be better or am I just worrying about pointless minutiae and should just get on with my job? :-)

Thanks

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Exception handling is time expensive. –  Suzan Cioc Oct 11 '12 at 11:51
    
@SuzanCioc In terms of planning and coding or in terms of execution? You would be correct on both but I would certainly agree that exception handling takes a lot of thought, sometimes more than the actual normal flow of business logic. –  dassimon Oct 11 '12 at 11:56

4 Answers 4

I believe that in all cases were the answer does not clearly arise from technical analysis one should ignore the initial development work and study the future of the code.

To this end I would advise the first method as the best choice unless there is a real technical reason to choose the second.

In summary:

If there is no technical difference between two styles, consider the future reader of your code and make it as obvious as possible.

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Agreed, much of my time is spent working with legacy code of varying quality, some can be a real pain to try to understand. As code ages clarity becomes far more important than undocumented, hard to understand elegance and cleverness. I think @Marko does add a technical differnce in this case. –  dassimon Oct 11 '12 at 14:02

The beauty of exceptions is that you don't have to handle them where they occur. That's why you should in fact use your second style, but without the outer try-catch:

public void useMethodNestedHandlers() {
    Object o1 = exceptionMethod(); // Can be declared inside scope where it is used
    // Do something that requires o1
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        try {
            Object o2 = exceptionMethod(); // Can be declared inside scope where it is used
            // Here we would use the objects in some manner
            boolean equal = o1.equals(o2); // Just a pointless example
                                            // to show that both objects
                                            // are required
            // Assume the method does a load of stuff down here
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            // Assume we can continue to the next iteration after this
            // exception
            continue;
        }
    }
}

Code for the happy-day scenario and let someone else worry about failures. That's the way to achieve separation of concerns: usually all failures are treated by the same piece of code and catching too early breeds duplicated code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply, I think I agree with you about throwing exceptions further up the call stack when they cannot be explicitly handled at source and handle them in some common exception handling place. Although I don't think it good to just lazily rethrow anything that comes my way (although that's still better than just swallowing exceptions in empty catch blocks). As for letting someone else worry about failures that would generally just end up being me anyway :-) –  dassimon Oct 11 '12 at 13:56
    
Yes, I just use personified style to talk about code. Of course it is you, the writer, who controls puppets at both sides :) Why do you think it's lazy to let the exception propagate? A failure is a failure is a failure. Its specifics don't matter to the program, only to the develaper, and he is perfectly well served by an exception stacktrace. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 11 '12 at 13:58
    
I guess I was thinking it's lazy because some exceptions can be handled at source so some consideration should be given as to whether it needs to be rethrown. However I guess it's still the responsibility of the developer (or the team) to ensure that the exception is handled somewhere further up the call stack which is no less lazy. –  dassimon Oct 11 '12 at 14:15
    
The only time you should handle the exception is when the catch-block will contain actual business logic and in that case you won't doubt for a second whether you need to handle it or not. So, when in doubt, let it escape. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 11 '12 at 14:18

I would prefer both depends the condition.

Case 1

  Object obj;
   try {
     // do something 
  } catch (Exception e) {
        obj = default_obj; // assign default object
  }

   try {
      // do something either with specific or default object
   } catch (Exception e) {
       // handle exception
   }

Here even if the first try catch fails , proceed the action with default value

Case 2

try {
    Object obj; 
     // acquire object

    // do something only if acquire object is successful
} catch (Exception e) {
   // handle exception
}

Here do not proceed further when acquire object isn't successful.

Here it is way of handling exception is more of a necessity than a style.

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the code should be 1) correct, 2) readable. usually all irrecoverable exception should be handle in highest layer of application (or not at all). that means they should be properly displayed to the user. all recoverable exceptions should be handle 'as high' as possible. i advise to use as few try-catch statements as possible

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