Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class as follows:

public class RecipientEmailDetails
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public List<VacancyEmailDetails> Vacancies { get; set; }
}

This class needs to be changed to allow Vacancies to take in generic data for example as below:

public class RecipientEmailDetails<T>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public List<T> Vacancies { get; set; }
}

Unfortunately at present if I do this I'll need to change all the code that instantiates this class (which is many, many locations) to include this new generic type for example changing this:

List<RecipientEmailDetails> recipientEmailDetails = wrapper.GetRecipientEmails(emailCount);

To this:

List<RecipientEmailDetails<VacancyEmailDetails> recipientEmailDetails =   wrapper.GetRecipientEmails(emailCount);

Ultimately this is a lot of changes and many of these current locations will have no knowledge (and ideally should have no knowledge) of what type of data is stored in Vacancies. They will simply forward this information on until eventually the Vacancies list is checked and processed.

Anyway cut to the chase I'm looking for clever ways to store generic data in Vacancies without having to change everywhere how the RecipientEmailDetails object is initialised. I'd rather not have to box it and unbox it.

I should add that VacancyEmailDetails is currently like this:

public class VacancyEmailDetails
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Location { get; set; }
    public string Salary { get; set; }
    public string Notes { get; set; }
}

In all cases Vacancies will be rquired to hold objects similar to this one i.e. mainly data members with little or few methods. However the number, names and types of these members will vary considerably.

share|improve this question
4  
a perfectly good example of why you should use var as much as possible. There would have been no change to the metnioned code if the variables had been declared with implicit typing –  Rune FS Oct 11 '12 at 12:13
    
@RuneFS: No, var should not be used as much as possible. Often you want the code to be aware of the type, and if an interface changes, the code shouldn't just compile anyway and produce an unexpected result. –  Guffa Oct 11 '12 at 12:20
    
Using var everywhere is not something that's good programming practice in strongly typed languages imho and even if it did sort this issue out it could easily cause 10 other more serious issues further down the line instead. –  kh25 Oct 11 '12 at 12:23
    
@kh25 why? it's still statically typed. The difference is whether you have to change the declaration or not. A language like F# that have a tighter type system than C# has the practice reversed than what most C# programemrs have. Unless you really have to you never declare the type. In the case where you change the return type of the expression on the RHS to/from and interfacae from/to a concrete type and there's an explicit implementation that works different from the concrete type implementation then you will create a problem you would otherwise not have. That's not following leastsurprise –  Rune FS Oct 11 '12 at 12:30
    
@Guffa so the F# guys got it completely wrong. and that's a language where the saying is "if it compiles it works" fair enough the spell var let. it's still strongly typed using varso I can't see what changes you are talking about. I've been following "use var as much as possible" since C#3 and never ever had a bug because of it. –  Rune FS Oct 11 '12 at 12:33

3 Answers 3

Introduce an interface IRecipientEmailDetails, make your class to implement it and change the GetRecipientEmails method to return this interface.

public interface IRecipientEmailDetails {}

And the method in your class:

public IRecipientEmailDetails GetRecipientEmails(string emailCount) { } 

One way or another, you will have to change your code.

share|improve this answer

You could use an interface to define what's allowed, like:

public class RecipientEmailDetails
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public List<ISomeCommonInterface> Vacancies { get; set; }
}

And all classes implement this.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for the reponses. I decided against the Interface and instead redefined the class to this:

public class RecipientEmailDetails
{        
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public List<Dictionary <string, string>> Vacancies { get; set; }
}

The only thing then that had to change where a few lines such as these:

new RecipientEmailDetails{
    Name = "Test1",
    Email = "Test@hotmail.com",
    Vacancies = vacancies.Select(z => new VacancyEmailDetails{
                                           Id = z.Id.ToString(),
                                           Notes = z.Notes
                                       }).ToList()};

To these:

new RecipientEmailDetails{
    Name = "Test1",
    Email = "Test@hotmail.com",                                       
    Vacancies = vacancies.Select(z => new []{
new {Key = "Id", Value = z.Id.ToString()},
new {Key = "Notes", Value = z.Notes}}.ToDictionary(d => d.Key, d => d.Value)).ToList()})

This allowed me to do what I required and only to have to be explicitly concerned with the contents of Vacancies when I was populating and extracting the data from it and not everywhere RecipientEmailDetails was referenced.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.