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I am facing a weird situation with Visual C++ compiler optimization.

In a rather mid-size c++ code, compromising 10 static libraries, if the code is compiled with optimization being On (either /O1, /O2, or /Ox), the run of the program produces correct output.

With /Od though, the program produces wrong output.

I know this question is very general, but I appreciate any clue what the cause can be, or to what it can be associated.

p.s. the code is doing FEM numerics, so much of floating-point operations. p.s. the code is in Visual Studio 2010.

EDIT: sample output of the code:

the difference in r (residual) is considerable

I. without optimization:

Solver. time: 0.12, iteration: 1
Solver.
------------------------------------
determining values:
         dg.            0
         limit of dg.   0.897278
         dr.            7675.3
         limit of dr.   45.3704
         r.             7675.3
         limit of r.    453.704
         dx.            0.122164
         limit of dx.   8.97278e-005
------------------------------------

II. with optimization:

Solver. time: 0.12, iteration: 1
Solver.
------------------------------------
determining values:
         dg.            0
         limit of dg.   0.897278
         dr.            5894.53
         limit of dr.   45.3704
         r.             5894.53
         limit of r.    453.704
         dx.            0.122164
         limit of dx.   8.97278e-005
------------------------------------

p.s. I can not provide sample of code itself, bcs it really is not known where in the code the problem is stemming from.

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1  
Try to isolate the function where results become wrong. Check for using uninitialized variables. –  Andrey Oct 11 '12 at 12:28
    
If you can provide some code an/or example, you will probably get more and better answers :) –  dunadar Oct 11 '12 at 12:34
    
@Andrey I am trying to isolate the function(s), but with numerics it is not always easy. (i am still working on isolation) –  hamid attar Oct 11 '12 at 12:41
    
Without some code to go by all, we can do is guess. Are you getting drastically different results, or just slightly different? How do you know one is right, the other wrong? Have you tried configuring the floating point machinery so the very first Inf or NaN throws a floating point exception? Are you using uninitialized variables in calculations that the optimizer has conveniently optimized away? When results are different and one compilation happens to be right, its usually sheer dumb luck. That luck typically vaporizes the instant the product goes out the door. –  David Hammen Oct 11 '12 at 12:51
    
@DavidHammen I added sample output of one middle step of the program. I know the part II is right, bcs i can compare the output within a certain accuracy with the recorded known results in the Mechanics papers, for up to time 1.20. In part I (/Od) the computation does not even converge at time step 0.12. –  hamid attar Oct 11 '12 at 13:20
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2 Answers 2

The bug was revealed, it was uninitialized variable which looked like as initialized! I had defined a (double) constant kInfinity value in numerics library. Other libraries (fem, etc., which very much relied on the numerics library) took this value on the onset of the program from the numerics library, for using this value later on through the run of the program. The thing was that they took this value before it got initialized in the numerics library in the first place (this was like a race situation.)

Now comes the interesting part:

  • without optimization, the compiler set the uninitialized variables to 'zero' (quite well-known behaviour.) If such value is used in a "linear elastic material model" as "yield stress", that means non-physical material, meaning the code fails to produce interesting output.

  • with optimization, the compiler set the uninitialized variables to 'random' (in my case very big) number. If such value is used in a "linear elastic material model" as "yield stress", that perfectly means a linear elastic material (quite physical.)

That explains why with optimization my code worked, but not without.

Thanky for all the replies and sharing thoughts.

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It is difficult to say, but optimization could for example remove some arithmetic expressions and put "optimized" ones. By modifying the arithmetic expressions containing operations like addition, multiplication and so on, the results are influenced. You can have overflow, precision loss, ...

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1  
Here is one example: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa289157(v=vs.71).aspx –  ISTB Oct 11 '12 at 12:38
    
thanks for the answer. As for overflow, i have checked the code so far with BounceChecker, Rational Purify, and Application Verifier, none of them caught any such problem in the code. –  hamid attar Oct 11 '12 at 12:39
    
The problem is that you are probably running the simulation by using the finite elements. And during each step an error can be produced that is maybe small for one step, but at the end of the simulation (consisting of many steps) could accumulate into a big error... –  ISTB Oct 11 '12 at 12:49
    
Try forcing the type of floating-point arithmetics in debug and release. Start with fp:strict, and if both results match, move to precise –  dunadar Oct 11 '12 at 13:23
    
@ISTB i just tried fp:strict, the results still differ. One thing that i see in my situation is that it is counter-usual. i mean usually optimization may screw the floating-point operations, but in my case it is the other way round! –  hamid attar Oct 11 '12 at 13:57
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