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Can anyone come up with a shorter implementation of the function test below (which prints the same error message and has the same exit status)?

function test
{
   some-command
   exit_status=$?
   if [ $exit_status -ne 0 ]; then
      echo "some-command failed with exit status $exit_status" >&2
   fi
   return $exit_status
}
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closed as off topic by chepner, skolima, Peter Olson, BNL, Chris Laplante Oct 11 '12 at 17:54

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1  
You should probably not be overriding the built-in test command. –  tripleee Oct 11 '12 at 12:56
    
You probably want this: echo "msg" >&2 –  ceving Oct 11 '12 at 13:20

4 Answers 4

Return immediately if the command succeeds. Then, if you haven't returned, you know there was an error. This eliminates the need for the if statement.

function newTest {
    some-command && return 0
    exit_status=$?
    echo "some-command failed with exit status $exit_status" >&2
    return $exit_status
}
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some-command || echo "some-command failed with exit status $?" >&2

If you want to capture and return the exit status, do

function test { 
   some-command || r=$? && echo "some-command failed with exit status $r" >&2 && return $r 
}
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Or as a function, try () { "$@" && return 0; local r; r=$?; echo "$@ failed with exit status $r" >&2; return $r; } –  tripleee Oct 11 '12 at 12:58
1  
@January: The exit status of this (compound) command is always 0, so it does not have the same behavior as the function test. –  August Karlstrom Oct 11 '12 at 13:00
    
OK, see the modified version. –  January Oct 11 '12 at 14:05

My solution:

#!/bin/bash

test () {
    "$@" || eval "echo '$1 failed with exit status $?' >&2; exit $?" 
}

Hope this helps =)

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It should have been >&2 (redirection to stderr). Thanks for pointing it out, I have corrected it now. –  August Karlstrom Oct 11 '12 at 13:22
    
Ok, I now edited my answer to account for that =) –  Janito Vaqueiro Ferreira Filho Oct 11 '12 at 13:24

if you are not super picky about what exactly is logged on error and are always terminating the script on error then bullet-proof way of achieving what you need is

set -e

added to the very beginning of your script.

from "help set":

  -e  Exit immediately if a command exits with a non-zero status.
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1  
set -e terminates the shell. Quite useless for a test script, which probably has to perform many different tests. –  ceving Oct 11 '12 at 13:28

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