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I have an abstract base class called WidgetBase which looks like this:

public abstract class WidgetBase : Control, INamingContainer
{
     // This class declares abstract and virtual properties and methods but doesn't override anything
}

I have another abstract base class called ScrollerBase which looks like this:

public abstract class ScrollerBase : Control
{
    // This class has one abstract property and overrides OnInit and OnLoad
}

I need to create a class that inherits from both of these classes. Neither class can be converted to an interface. The simplest solution that I can think of is creating an extra WidgetBase class like this:

public abstract class ScrollingWidgetBase : ScrollerBase, INamingContainer
{
     // Lots of duplicated code from WidgetBase
}

It would be nice if I could do something like this:

public abstract class ScrollingWidgetBase : WidgetBase<ScrollerBase>    { /* Empty */ }
public abstract class WidgetBase : WidgetBase<Control>    { /* Empty */ }
public abstract class WidgetBase<T> : T, INamingContainer    { /* Code goes here */ }

However this isn't possible. The only half elegant solution that I can think of would be something like this:

public interface IScroller { /* Overridable members go here */ }
public class WidgetBase : Control, INamingContainer
{
    protected override void OnInit(EventArgs e)
    {
        if (this is IScroller)
        {
            // Do scroller logic here
        }
    }
    protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
    {
        if (this is IScroller)
        {
            // Do scroller logic here
        }
    }
}

public class Test : WidgetBase, IScroller {  }

However this would get very messy if more classes were created. Surely there must be some kind of design pattern that fixes this problem? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Joe

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It looks like the decorator pattern isn't what I'm after since it requires that ScrollerBase derive from WidgetBase (or some common interface.) I want ScrollerBase to be applicable to all sorts of other classes. Just reading up on composition now. –  JoeNFU Oct 11 '12 at 13:50
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As hyde said, you really would need to separate your behaviour from what your classes are. You said you didn't want to use interfaces; well, I can't think of a way around that. You may have to bite the bullet or do some code duplication.

At minimal, you can move the behaviour logic to a separate controlling class and simply feed it some interface that exposes the members needed. Consider the few properties you need for a scrollable UI control (mind you, this is all just whipped off examples, I doubt these types exist as I describe, or these are the actual minimum set needed):

public interface ISCrollable
{
    Control Target { get; }
    ScrollBar Bar { get; }
    double FullLength { get; }
    double VisibleLength { get; }
}

You then can put your scrolling behaviour in a class that attaches that behaviour or works upon an IScrollable:

public class Scroller
{
    public Scroller(ISCrollable scrollable)
    {
        //attach behaviour
        scrollable.Bar.OnClick += DoScroll;
        //and other stuff
    }
}

Finally, your ScrollableWidget would be your Control and attach the scrolling behaviour rather than inheriting it:

public class ScrollableWidget : Control, INamingContainer, ISCrollable, IWidget
{
    private Scroller ScrollBehaviour;
    private Widgeter = WidgetBehaviour;

    public Control Target { get; private set; }
    public ScrollBar Bar { get; private set; }
    public double FullLength { get; private set; }
    public double VisibleLength { get; private set; }

    public ScrollableWidget()
    {
        this.Target = this;
        this.Bar = CreateScrollBarControl();
        this.FullLength = 9001;
        this.VisibleLength = this.ActualHeight;

        this.ScrollBehaviour = new Scroller(this);
        this.WidgetBehaviour = new Widgeter(this);
    }
}

So yeah, you're going to want to use interfaces. I don't understand your requirement not to. There are other patterns, such as Decorator, that may be a better suit than the mess I just posted.

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Thanks for the code, I've nothing against interfaces. What I was saying is that both classes declare bodies of code so couldn't be contained in just an interface. However using a class and an interface (IScrollable and Scroller in your example) makes sense, thanks. –  JoeNFU Oct 11 '12 at 13:24
    
@JoeNFU Yeah, so try moving the logic/implementation of those classes to a separate controller that isn't dependent on the class hierarchy and instead just attaches behaviour to any IScrollable provided to it. –  Chris Sinclair Oct 11 '12 at 13:27
    
Thats fixed it, thanks. Going to go read a book on design patterns now. –  JoeNFU Oct 11 '12 at 14:27
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The old principle applies: Composition over Inheritance.

Do not inherit, unless the class actually needs to act as the base class, instead put the would-be base class as member of the would-be derived class.

Use interfaces instead of classes as method parameter types etc, so you can actually use composition instead of inheritance.

When using composition, learn to use your IDEs refactoring features to insert delegate methods for member objects.

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If i understatnd correctly, than scroller is decorator for widget.

1) Create interface IWidgetBase.

2) Implement decorator

class ScrollDecorator:IWidgetBase{
   IWidgetBase _decoratedWidget;
   public ScrollDecorator(IWidgetBase widget){
       _decoratedWidget=widget;
   }
   //implementation  
}
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I assume that ScrollerBase can't be modified to inherit from WidgetBase for some reason. That would really be the best solution.

Failing that, you can achieve something like multiple inheritance by combining extension methods with interfaces.

public interface IWidgetBase
{
  bool SomeBool { get; }
  void DoWidgetyStuff();
}
public static class IWidgetBaseExtensions
{
  public static void WidgetStuff(this IWidgetBase base)
  {
    if (base.SomeBool) 
      base.DoWidgetyStuff();
  }
}


public class ScrollerBase : Control, IWidgetBase
{
  public bool SomeBool { get; protected set; }
  public void DoWidgetyStuff() {
    // Do stuff
  }
}

// Main code:
IWidgetBase myScroller = new ScrollerBase();
myScroller.WidgetStuff();

Depending on what you have your code doing, this may or may not be a better answer than the composition that other people have suggested.

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