Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a 2 COM DLLs that are built the same way for .NET 3.0 - one that fetches data from the database - one that fetches data from a webservice

We have always registered the DLLs using RegAsm.exe with the following commands:

cd "C:\Program Files\Dispatcher\COM\Custom" C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\RegAsm.exe MercatorRepositoryCOM.dll /tlb:MercatorRepositoryCOM.tlb /codebase C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\RegAsm.exe MercatorUtilitiesCOM.dll /tlb:MercatorUtilitiesCOM.tlb /codebase

This works on most of our servers (Win2008R2 32b)

On our newest server the output says: registered successfully. However, the application can access the MercatorUtilitiesCOM.dll but not the MercatorRepositoryCOM.dll.

We have tried registering the DLLs using RegAsm, regsvr32, regtlibv12 and even adding them to GAC. Nothing works.

Is there any way we can troubleshoot this better than "(10092) ActiveX Automation: server cannot create object."? IS there any other way to try and register these DLLs?

We tried adding logging to the DLL code but the log is never written so we can assume the DLL is not even called.

PS: We have no choice but to expose these as COM DLLs because we have a scanning/indexing application based on VB6 that needs to reference these. It is Dispatcher (for those who might know it).

UPDATE: After further investigation, it looks like DLL might be registered correctly after all. When we unregister it, we get a clear message that Dispatcher can't find the DLL reference. When we register it, Dispatcher opens and then throws the ActiveX Automation error. So it seems the DLL has been registered correctly, but for some reason it can't instantiate my class inside the DLL.

SOLUTION: The issue was unrelated to DLL registration after all. Apparently there had some been some internal changes in the application the launches Dispatcher. It used to spawn it als a subprocess so it could use the same app.config but they changed it to run as a separate process (it's own executable). This meant that it could not find our configs and endpoints in the app.config. We created a separate app.config for the new executable and it works. Thanks for all your help!

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried directly LoadLibrary()'ing the file? or ran depends.exe and determine if it has a DLL dependency of its own that cannot be satisfied with the current search load path ? Maybe rule out a lib load issue before worrying about the registration. –  WhozCraig Oct 11 '12 at 13:14
    
I have compared the results of depends.exe on our new server with the other servers and it says for both that IEFRAME.dll is missing. That seems ignorable. –  B.T. Oct 11 '12 at 13:27
    
That would be ignorable. and there are no delay-loaded DLL's that are also required ? then you're likely not finding the DLL by registration info correctly. Charlie's answer below about procmon is an excellent one to monitor exactly what is tried when the loader tries to find the DLL. you will get the whole mess, so try and filter down to file open calls. –  WhozCraig Oct 11 '12 at 13:31
    
Just as a sanity check, can you verify that the exact same build of the DLL that's failing to load on the test server loads successfully on your development system? Meaning copy that very same file from the test server to the development server, register it, and try to use it. Another thing that will prevent .NET COM components from loading is having the class be non-public or not having a public default constructor, so I would check for that as well. –  Charlie Oct 11 '12 at 14:13
    
I have verified that the exact same DLL (copied to the working server) works. With and without re-registering it. –  B.T. Oct 11 '12 at 14:26

2 Answers 2

As @WhozCraig suggested, you may have some other problem unrelated to COM registration. The fact that this is happening on a brand new test server argues strongly that there's some other dependency that you forgot to install, which is used by the failing component but not the other one. I would compare the assembly references between the two and check on any differences you see.

Another easy test would be to load your dll on the new test server using depends.exe or by calling LoadLibrary directly. Since it's a managed assembly, this may not yield anything, but it's easy to try.

Next you might want to try running the Assembly Binding Log Viewer (fuslogvw.exe) on the test server to see if the assembly is trying to reference some other assembly and failing. The basic approach is to run the viewer, click Settings and switch to "Log bind failures to disk", and optionally clear any existing logs. Now run the program that fails to load the COM object, reproduce the failure, and refresh the list in the log viewer. If you see a new entry, that may be the culprit.

The last and most powerful tool I often use for diagnosing these errors is procmon, which you would run on the test server while your application attempts to load the non-working COM DLL. This will show you all of the file, registry, and network access being performed by programs on the test server, so I would probably use filtering to show only the output from the program that loads the DLL. In general what you're looking for are file or registry accesses that fail due to File Not Found or Access Denied. You'll probably see a lot of File Not Found errors that aren't actually a problem, but pay close attention to the last ones that appear before the application reports the error.

It could also be problem with the assembly itself, such as:

  • The implementing class is non-public or not ComVisible
  • The implementing class does not have a public default constructor
  • A static constructor in the assembly is throwing an exception
  • The instance constructor of the implementing class is throwing an exception

I assume that the first two are not the issue here, but maybe your class is trying to access some resource on the test server and failing?

share|improve this answer
    
Tried procmon and I can see the DLLs being accessed by no error or 'file not found'. SO nothing there that points us in the right direction. I'm gonna try Assembly Binding Log Viewer now. EDIT: the fuslogvw doesn't show anything when I reproduce the error. –  B.T. Oct 11 '12 at 13:57
    
I've been playing with procmon abit and have found the following 'errors' about my DLL: FAST_IO_DISALLOWED (seems harmless), FILE LOCKED WITH ONLY READERS (seems harmless aswell) and then some BUFFER OVERFLOW errors (???). Other than that, I can't find a connection to any other DLL or missing item. –  B.T. Oct 11 '12 at 14:28
    
The fast IO errors are indeed harmless. The buffer overflow errors are harmless as well, they just indicate that the client code is probing to find out how much memory is required to perform some operation. The file locking error might be a problem and might not be; are those failing for the dll itself or some file that the dll needs? I wouldn't expect anyone to be opening the dll for writing, but if it's a file used by the dll, it could definitely be related. Are those failures followed by successful opens of the same file? –  Charlie Oct 11 '12 at 14:46
    
Actually I think you're right that the file locking errors are benign, as long as they are followed by successful opens. You might look for possible exceptions being thrown by static or instance constructors (see recent additions to my answer). –  Charlie Oct 11 '12 at 15:00
    
About the last part of your post: the class is public and the project has been marked as COM-visible in Visual Studio (note: it works on other machines), it has a public constructor, there are no static constructors. It is possible that an error is thrown INSIDE the default constructor (there are 2 lines of code) but we added some logging to the constructor to log whenever it was accessed and the log was never written (so we assume it doesn't get accessed at all). –  B.T. Oct 12 '12 at 9:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue was unrelated to DLL registration after all. Apparently there had some been some internal changes in the application that launches Dispatcher. It used to spawn it als a subprocess so it could use the same app.config but they changed it to run as a separate process (its own executable). This meant that it could not find our configs and endpoints in the app.config. We created a separate app.config for the new executable and it works.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.