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I have two list,

l1 = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
l2 = [3,2]

what i want is to remove the element of list l1 which is in l2, for that i have done something like this,

for x in l1:
    if x in l2:
        l1.remove(x)

it gives output like

[1, 3, 4, 5, 6]

but the output should be like

[1, 4, 5, 6]

can any one shed light on this.

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8 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is easily explained like this.

consider the first array you have:

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |

Now you start iterating

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
  ^

Nothing happens, iterator increments

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
      ^

2 gets removed

| 1 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
      ^

iterator increments

| 1 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
          ^

And voila, 3 is still there.

The solution is to iterate ove a copy of the vector e.g.

for x in l1[:]: <- slice on entire array
    if x in l2:
        l1.remove(x)

or to iterate in reverse:

for x in reversed(l1):
    if x in l2:
        l1.remove(x)

Which acts like this:

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
              ^

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
          ^

| 1 | 2 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
          ^

| 1 | 2 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
      ^

| 1 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
      ^

| 1 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
  ^
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Why not making it a bit simpler? No need to actually iterate over l1 if we only want to remove elements present in l2:

for item in l2:
    while item in l1:
        l1.remove(item)

This gives you exactly the output desired...

Also, as commenters point out, if there is a possibility that we can have duplicates:

l1 = filter(lambda x: x not in l2, l1)

.. or many other variations using list comprehensions.

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Quite a good point ... –  mgilson Oct 11 '12 at 13:38
    
+1, a good option if you want to do it in-place. –  Lattyware Oct 11 '12 at 13:38
    
@TimPietzcker Maybe change the if to while then? :) –  poke Oct 11 '12 at 13:44
    
@TimPietzcker absolutely correct - did not consider that case –  petr Oct 11 '12 at 13:44
1  
@poke's idea to switch if for while was spot-on. Now your solution is the fastest yet. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 11 '12 at 13:54
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You want the outer loop to read:

for x in l1[:]:
   ...

You can't change a list while iterating over it and expect reasonable results. The above trick makes a copy of l1 and iterates over the copy instead.

Note that if order doesn't matter in the output list, and your elements are unique and hashable, you could use a set:

set(l1).difference(l2)

which will give you a set as output, but you can construct a list from it easily:

l1 = list(set(l1).difference(l2))
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sets are heavily under-used. ;) –  K.-Michael Aye Aug 8 '13 at 18:53
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As others have said, you can't edit a list while you loop over it. A good option here is to use a list comprehension to create a new list.

removals = set(l2)
l1 = [item for item in l1 if item not in removals]

We make a set as a membership check on a set is significantly faster than on a list.

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1  
Have you ever done any benchmarking to test at what point membership checks become faster for a set than a list? I would expect that for a collection of length 2, in would be faster (on average) for a list than a set. but for a collection of length 4, I would guess a set would be faster. I'm not really sure, and I've often thought about setting up a benchmark to check, I just never have. –  mgilson Oct 11 '12 at 13:41
    
@mgilson And don't forget the overhead of copying the original list into the set. That said, it's safe to assume that in real usage, you either have more data to work with, or you don't care about micro-optimising the performance of code working with this little data. This approach will also probably perform better than the in-place versions because you only iterate over both lists once. (As opposed to on every call to list.remove().) –  millimoose Oct 11 '12 at 13:45
    
@millimoose -- You're right of course that it's a micro optimization that is unlikely to be worth worrying about. It's just a matter of curiosity for me (and I agree that unless you KNOW the size of the collection, you should definitely use a set). –  mgilson Oct 11 '12 at 13:50
1  
You could also make this "in-place" if you used slice assignment on the lhs: l1[:] = [item for item in l1 ... ] –  mgilson Oct 11 '12 at 13:51
    
@mgilson Great catch. When doing that, you can also use a generator comprehension instead, and avoid an extra copy. –  millimoose Oct 11 '12 at 13:53
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Edit: Removed my original answer because even though it did give correct results, it did so for non-intuitive reasons, and is was not very fast either... so I've just left the timings:

import timeit

setup = """l1 = list(range(20)) + list(range(20))
l2 = [2, 3]"""

stmts = {
"mgilson": """for x in l1[:]:
    if x in l2:
        l1.remove(x)""",
"petr": """for item in l2:
    while item in l1:
        l1.remove(item)""",
"Lattyware": """removals = set(l2)
l1 = [item for item in l1 if item not in removals]""",
"millimoose": """for x in l2:
    try: 
        while True: l1.remove(x)
    except ValueError: pass""",
"Latty_mgilson": """removals = set(l2)
l1[:] = (item for item in l1 if item not in removals)""",
"mgilson_set": """l1 = list(set(l1).difference(l2))"""
}        

for idea in stmts:
    print("{0}: {1}".format(idea, timeit.timeit(setup=setup, stmt=stmts[idea])))

Results (Python 3.3.0 64bit, Win7):

mgilson_set: 2.5841989922197333
mgilson: 3.7747968857414813
petr: 1.9669433777815701
Latty_mgilson: 7.262900152285258
millimoose: 3.1890831105541793
Lattyware: 4.573971325181478
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I'm not sure I'd be comfortable with relying on implementation details of the iterator. Or is list explicitly guaranteed to support comodification when iterating in reverse? –  millimoose Oct 11 '12 at 13:40
    
@millimoose: Yes, at least in this case, because if we're removing something, it's always an item we've already iterated over. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 11 '12 at 13:41
1  
@Tim, careful, in the second exampe you are removing the first '2' when you iterate over the second one –  gnibbler Oct 11 '12 at 13:52
    
@gnibbler: You mean in the "petr" code? It returns the correct result, so I'm unsure what you mean? –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 11 '12 at 14:00
2  
Actually, I think I understand now. If you remove a duplicate that's earlier in the list than the element the iterator is currently at, the removal will shift your current element one position to the left where the next iteration will encounter it again, until it's removed at last. I'm still not sure whether that makes the approach completely correct though. (I think I'll stick with my reservations towards relying on the iterator state doing the right thing in the face of co-modifications - this is a scary lot of potential pitfalls to keep in mind even to do something as trivial as this.) –  millimoose Oct 11 '12 at 14:13
show 15 more comments

If the order and loss of duplicates in l1 do not matter:

list(set(l1) - set(l2))

The last list() is only required if you need the result as a list. You could also just use the resulting set, it's also iterable. If you need it ordered you can of course call l.sort() on the resulting list.

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You're modifying the list l1 while you're iterating over it, this will cause weird behaviour. (The 3 will get skipped during iteration.)

Either iterate over a copy, or change your algorithm to iterate over l2 instead:

for x in l2:
    try: 
        while True: l1.remove(x)
    except ValueError: pass

(This should perform better than testing if x in l1 explicitly.) Nope, this performs terribly as l1 grows in size.

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FWIW I get significantly different results than @Tim Pietzcker did using what I believe is more realistic input data set and by using a little more rigorous (but otherwise the same) approach to timing different people's answers.

The names and code snippets are the same as Tim's except I added a variation of the one named Lattyware called Lattyware_rev which determines what elements to keep rather than reject -- it turned out to be a slower than the former. Note that the two fastest don't preserve the order of l1.

Here's the latest timing code:

import timeit

setup = """
import random
random.seed(42) # initialize to constant to get same test values
l1 = [random.randrange(100) for _ in xrange(100)]
l2 = [random.randrange(100) for _ in xrange(10)]
"""

stmts = {
"Minion91": """
for x in reversed(l1):
    if x in l2:
        l1.remove(x)
""",

"mgilson": """
for x in l1[:]: # correction
    if x in l2:
        l1.remove(x)
""",
"mgilson_set": """
l1 = list(set(l1).difference(l2))
""",

"Lattyware": """
removals = set(l2)
l1 = [item for item in l1 if item not in removals]
""",
"Lattyware_rev": """
keep = set(l1).difference(l2)
l1 = [item for item in l1 if item in keep]
""",
"Latty_mgilson": """
removals = set(l2)
l1[:] = (item for item in l1 if item not in removals)""",

"petr": """
for item in l2:
    while item in l1:
        l1.remove(item)
""",
"petr (handles dups)": """
l1 = filter(lambda x: x not in l2, l1)
""",

"millimoose": """
for x in l2:
    try:
        while True: l1.remove(x)
    except ValueError: pass
""",

"K.-Michael Aye": """
l1 = list(set(l1) - set(l2))
""",

}

N = 10000
R = 3

timings = [(idea,
            min(timeit.repeat(stmts[idea], setup=setup, repeat=R, number=N)),
           ) for idea in stmts]
longest = max(len(t[0]) for t in timings)  # length of longest name
exec(setup)  # get an l1 & l2 just for heading length measurements
print('fastest to slowest timings of ideas:\n' +\
      '  ({:,d} timeit calls, best of {:d} executions)\n'.format(N, R)+\
      '   len(l1): {:,d}, len(l2): {:,d})\n'.format(len(l1), len(l2)))
for i in sorted(timings, key=lambda x: x[1]):  # sort by speed (fastest first)
    print "{:>{width}}:  {}".format(*i, width=longest)

Output:

fastest to slowest timings of ideas:
  (10,000 timeit calls, best of 3 executions)
   len(l1): 100, len(l2): 10)

        mgilson_set:  0.143126456832
     K.-Michael Aye:  0.213544010551
          Lattyware:  0.23666971551
      Lattyware_rev:  0.466918513924
      Latty_mgilson:  0.547516608553
               petr:  0.552547776807
            mgilson:  0.614238139366
           Minion91:  0.728920176815
         millimoose:  0.883061820848
petr (handles dups):  0.984093136969

Of course, please let me know if there's something radically wrong that would explain the radically different results.

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I know this is old, so excuse the necro - but I notice the Lattyware_rev test is flawed - the assignment to l1 makes a generator, but doesn't consume it, so it's not really doing the same thing as the other tests. –  Lattyware Aug 8 '13 at 21:31
1  
@Lattyware: Good catch...although fixing it didn't make much difference. Regardless, the info needed updating. Thanks. –  martineau Aug 8 '13 at 23:43
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