Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm surprised how much slower the List range is for the example below. On my machine the for loop is a factor of 8 or so quicker.

Is an actual list of 10,000,000 elements created first? And if so, is there a reason (other than it has not been done yet) why this can't be optimised away by the compiler?

open System
open System.Diagnostics

let timeFunction f v =
    let sw = Stopwatch.StartNew()
    let result = f v
    sw.ElapsedMilliseconds

let length = 10000000

let doSomething n =
    (float n) ** 0.1 |> ignore

let listIter n =
    [1..length] |> List.iter (fun x -> doSomething (x+n))

let forLoop n = 
    for x = 1 to length do
        doSomething (x+n)

printf "listIter   : %d\n" (timeFunction listIter 1)  // c50
GC.Collect()
printf "forLoop    : %d\n" (timeFunction forLoop 1)  // c1000
GC.Collect()
share|improve this question
2  
You're creating a list. An actual list. During runtime. That involves many allocations. The loop doesn't allocate anything. You might have better luck with {0..length} |> Seq.iter because that doesn't allocate anything. It will still be slower, but not by much. –  GreĝRos Oct 11 '12 at 15:45
    
seq is much faster, but still 2.5x slower than forLoop. I added timings to my answer. –  Daniel Oct 11 '12 at 16:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Using ILSpy, listIter looks like this:

public static void listIter(int n)
{
    ListModule.Iterate<int>(
        new listIter@17(n), 
        SeqModule.ToList<int>(
            Operators.CreateSequence<int>(
                Operators.OperatorIntrinsics.RangeInt32(1, 1, 10000000)
            )
        )
    );
}

Here are the basic steps involved:

  1. RangeInt32 creates an IEnumerable (which is inexplicably wrapped by CreateSequence)
  2. SeqModule.ToList builds a list from that sequence
  3. An instance of listIter@17 (your lambda) is new'd up
  4. ListModule.Iterate traverses the list calling the lambda for each element

vs forLoop, which doesn't look much different from what you've written:

public static void forLoop(int n)
{
    for (int x = 1; x < 10000001; x++)
    {
        int num = x + n;
        double num2 = Math.Pow((double)num, 0.1);
    }
}

...no IEnumerable, lambda (it's automatically inlined), or list creation. There's a potentially significant difference in the amount of work being done.

EDIT

For curiosity's sake, here are FSI timings for list, seq, and for loop versions:

listIter - Real: 00:00:03.889, CPU: 00:00:04.680, GC gen0: 57, gen1: 51, gen2: 6  
seqIter  - Real: 00:00:01.340, CPU: 00:00:01.341, GC gen0:  0, gen1:  0, gen2: 0  
forLoop  - Real: 00:00:00.565, CPU: 00:00:00.561, GC gen0:  0, gen1:  0, gen2: 0

and the seq version for reference:

let seqIter n =
    {1..length} |> Seq.iter (fun x -> doSomething (x+n))
share|improve this answer
1  
Another part of the reason is that with the for loop, the generated code is simple, fast, and has good data locality. The code for the range has a lot of jumps/branches which add a lot of latency to each individual step of the loop. –  Jack P. Oct 11 '12 at 15:02
    
I'd like to point out that the creation of the list is the problem. Creating a list involves many non-local heap allocations. The jump/branch thing is probably a very small problem in comparison. –  GreĝRos Oct 11 '12 at 15:46

Using {1..length} |> Seq.iter is certainly faster as you don't create the full list in memory.

Another slightly faster way than your for loop is:

let reclist n =
    let rec downrec x n =
        match x with 
        | 0 -> ()
        | x -> doSomething (x+n); downrec (x-1) n
    downrec length n

Interesting is that the code for the recursive function boils down to:

while (true)
{
    switch (x)
    {
    case 0:
        return;
    default:
    {
        int num = x + n;
        double num2 = Math.Pow((double)num, 0.1);
        int arg_26_0 = x - 1;
        n = n;
        x = arg_26_0;
        break;
    }
    }
}

Even when using optimization, there are still a few lines that could have been removed, i.e to this:

while (true)
{
    switch (x)
    {
    case 0:
        return;
    default:
    {
        int num = x + n;
        double num2 = Math.Pow((double)num, 0.1);
        x = x - 1;
        break;
    }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't see how forinlist can be faster than forLoop; it compiles to exactly the same thing. –  Daniel Oct 11 '12 at 20:55
    
I get slightly different timings, but maybe only due to the JIT. The code as you say are identical in the "for..in" case. I do however get roughly the same results every time I run these functions. The order may have some impact on the results. listIter : 4457 forLoop : 586 arrayiter : 1893 seqIter : 1803 forinlist : 567 reclist: 569 –  Storstamp Oct 11 '12 at 21:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.