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I ran into a terrible error in testing some code. I figured out that it was caused by calling free(p_current_item->s) where p_current_item is a node in a linked list, and s is the char* it contains. I created the node by calling a method addItem(node,char*) which simply adds the element to the list: p_head=addItem(p_head,"this gets added"); What is bothering me is:

1) Why I would need to free the string contained in the element. I know it is necessary when s is declared as char* s = snprintf(s,(size_t),30,"this gets added"); (which is how it was done in my class example) but why is that necessary- is it possible to have the attributes contained within a struct (in this case the linkedList node) be freed when the struct itself is freed?

2) what was happening when I tried to free the value of s which was explicitly declared

3) Do i need to free up the value of s some other way?

Thanks :-)

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5  
Simple rule: For every malloc (or calloc) you need one free. No more and no less. Check your code for that. –  Kerrek SB Oct 11 '12 at 14:36
3  
char* s = snprintf(s,(size_t),30,"this gets added"); is broken code -- it scribbles on random memory! –  j_random_hacker Oct 11 '12 at 14:37
    
yeah i meant to mark that as pseudocode, apologies. Thanks everyone –  benbenbenbenben Oct 11 '12 at 15:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can only free memory which has been allocated using the malloc family of calls.

Strings encapsulated in double quotes are compile time constants. They get imported into your runtime program together with the instruction text. Thus those have not been allocated dynamically.

Also snprintf returns the length of the produced string, not a pointer to it. the correct usage would be:

size_t length = snprintf(s,(size_t)30,"this gets added");

1) You only need to free s if it was allocated using malloc, calloc or another call from that family. e.g. char* s = malloc(1024);

2) free("constant string"); will at best result in a segmentation violation because you are trying to deallocate memory which has not been allocated by the malloc family of calls. Generally this is undefined behaviour.

3) You do not need to free constant strings, they are part of your text and cannot be freed even if you wanted to do so.

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1  
"Will result in a segmentation violation" is overstating it. If you're lucky it will segfault, but you really don't know what will happen. Depends on the OS, the program's layout, the values of stuff around the literal, etc etc etc. You might just end up rewriting the values of all your constants. :) –  cHao Oct 11 '12 at 14:43
    
@cHao point taken. It is undefined behaviour. –  Sergey L. Oct 11 '12 at 14:50
    
What about alloca? –  735Tesla May 27 '14 at 20:18
    
@735Tesla memory allocated by alloca is "deallocated" when your function returns. Beware of inlined functions which do not release memory aquired by alloca until the function that inlined them returns. Use with caution. –  Sergey L. May 28 '14 at 17:10

When you declare s as you have done in your code, it is not allocated in the heap. And free() is called only if you need to free memory that you have allocated dynamically in the heap using malloc or calloc - which is not the case in your code.

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Literal strings like "this gets added" are allocated fixed memory addresses in the executable, just like global and static variables. You don't need to, and can't, deallocate them.

If you have the situation where a cleanup function doesn't know whether it needs to call free() or not, and it sometimes might need to, the best solution is to make heap-based copies of everything and always call free(). Conveniently you can do this for strings with strdup():

p_head=addItem(p_head, strdup("this gets added"));
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1) Why I would need to free the string contained in the element. I know it is necessary when s is declared as char* s = snprintf(s,(size_t),30,"this gets added"); (which is how it was done in my class example) but why is that necessary- is it possible to have the attributes contained within a struct (in this case the linkedList node) be freed when the struct itself is freed?

You need to free whatever memory you have allocated.

char *s = snprintf(s, ...)

is doing it wrong. You need to:

char *s = NULL;   // Declare memory -- and initialize it to NULL just to be safe.
                  // This way, using unallocated memory will be easily spotted.

s = malloc(30);   // Allocate the memory
if (NULL == s)    // Check that it has been allocated.
{
    abort();
}
// Use the memory: sprintf into s
snprintf(s, "My name is %s", 30, "John");

// Use the result
printf("%s\n", s);

free(s);    // Free the memory
s = NULL;   // If you're really paranoid, NULL out its pointer.
            // This way, also using no-longer-allocated memory will be spotted.

You may also meet valgrind and discover he's an inflexible but valuable friend.

2) what was happening when I tried to free the value of s which was explicitly declared

Nothing good :-) . The memory allocator discovered an error, and promptly crashed your program to avoid worse to happen.

3) Do i need to free up the value of s some other way?

If you have allocated it, yes. See above.

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