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I would like to use unsorted generic collection to store values.

Set<Integer> map = new HashSet<Integer>();
map.Add( new Integer( 3 ) );
map.Add( new Integer( 2 ) );
map.Add( new Integer( 4 ) );
map.Add( new Integer( 1 ) );

I suppose the elements would be 3,2,4,1. Then I would like to create an array from this set:

Integer[] arr = ( Integer[] )map.toArray( new Integer[map.size()] );

And I'm surprised because the elements in arr are in different order than I put into map. The deal is to get an array like this:

arr[0] = 3;
arr[1] = 2;
arr[2] = 4;
arr[3] = 1;

What should I do for this?

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3  
Did you read the JavaDoc? – home Oct 11 '12 at 14:53
    
maybe an ArrayList will help you better – MaVRoSCy Oct 11 '12 at 14:53
    
HashSet: It makes no guarantees as to the iteration order of the set; in particular, it does not guarantee that the order will remain constant over time. This class permits the null element. Use java.util.List / java.util.ArrayList instead. – Yogendra Singh Oct 11 '12 at 14:54
2  
the question title doesn't seem to match the question at all – matt b Oct 11 '12 at 15:00
1  
You seem to be confussing "order" and "sort". Collections are ordered if there is precise control over where in the list each element is inserted. Collections can be sorted if you can order then using the "Natural Order" of it's elements. See Comparable to implement "Natural ordening". – J.A.I.L. Oct 11 '12 at 15:07
up vote 5 down vote accepted

HashSet does not guarantee that the order will remain same. If you want to maintain order then use ArrayList.

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1  
Or just any class that implements List (as ArrayList, LinkedList, etc).- – J.A.I.L. Oct 11 '12 at 14:56
2  
+1 or use LinkedHashSet – Peter Lawrey Oct 11 '12 at 15:06
    
Peter +1, as @zuxqoj wrote in his solution. – J.A.I.L. Oct 11 '12 at 15:13

Sets are unordered. It is not guaranteed to maintain the order of the elements. You need to use a list if the order you added the elements should remain the same.

List<Integer> map = new ArrayList<Integer>();
map.add( new Integer( 3 ) );
map.add( new Integer( 2 ) );
map.add( new Integer( 4 ) );
map.add( new Integer( 1 ) );
share|improve this answer
    
Nice explanation of why a List is needed, and propper use of its interface. – J.A.I.L. Oct 11 '12 at 15:09

use LinkedHashSet instead of HashSet

    Set<Integer> map = new LinkedHashSet<Integer>();
    map.add( new Integer( 3 ) );
    map.add( new Integer( 2 ) );
    map.add( new Integer( 4 ) );
    map.add( new Integer( 1 ) );

    Integer[] arr = ( Integer[] )map.toArray( new Integer[map.size()] );

    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(arr));
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You could use LinkedHashSet to preserve the input order:

Set<Integer> map = new LinkedHashSet<Integer>();
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