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I have a code that takes a value from a button and then outputs something. If I don't use a break; and I press on the left button, it will output thousands of left. The same for enter and right.

I am no Java guru and I started just few weeks ago with Java programming.

I want my code never to stop reading the button value, but I don't want my code to output thousands of left, right or enter when a button is pushed. How can I do this? This code is working but stops after I push one button. If I push button left, it will output left once, and then stops running. Without the break; it will output thousands of left.

for (int i = 0; ; i++) {

        // Get the data from analog input 5
        int sensorValue1 = phidget.getSensorValue(1);
        int sensorValue2 = phidget.getSensorValue(2);
        int sensorValue3 = phidget.getSensorValue(3);

        if (sensorValue1 > 100 || sensorValue2 > 100 || sensorValue3 > 100){
        // printing value
        //System.out.println("sensorValue1 = " + sensorValue1 + ", sensorValue2 = " + sensorValue2 + ", sensorValue3 = " + sensorValue3 + ", Count = " + i);
            if (sensorValue1 > 100){

                System.out.println("RIGHT");

                // simulates RIGHT key
                try { 
                Robot robot = new Robot(); 
                robot.keyPress(KeyEvent.VK_RIGHT); 
                } catch (AWTException e) { 
                e.printStackTrace(); 
                }
                break;

            } else if (sensorValue2 > 100)
            {
                System.out.println("LEFT");

                // simulates LEFT key
                try { 
                Robot robot = new Robot(); 
                robot.keyPress(KeyEvent.VK_LEFT); 
                } catch (AWTException e) { 
                e.printStackTrace(); 
                }
                break;
            } else if (sensorValue3 > 100)
            {
                System.out.println("ENTER");

                // simulates ENTER key
                try { 
                Robot robot = new Robot(); 
                robot.keyPress(KeyEvent.VK_ENTER); 
                } catch (AWTException e) { 
                e.printStackTrace(); 
                }
                break;
            } 
        } else {}

    }
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by bmargulies, Rohit Jain, Frank van Puffelen, Bananeweizen, Mike Mackintosh Oct 12 '12 at 16:44

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Well I don't see any reason behind your outer most if construct.. – Rohit Jain Oct 11 '12 at 14:59
    
And I really didn't understand what you want.. – Rohit Jain Oct 11 '12 at 15:00
    
can't you add eventHandling in your code? do something when which button was pressed? – Kent Oct 11 '12 at 15:03
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can track the last handled value of sensorValue and a click is considered to have occured when the new value of sensorValue1 is over 100 while the old value is under 100.

int oldSensorValue1 = 0;
int oldSensorValue2 = 0;
int oldSensorValue3 = 0;
for (int i = 0; ; i++) {

    // Get the data from analog input 5
    int sensorValue1 = phidget.getSensorValue(1);
    int sensorValue2 = phidget.getSensorValue(2);
    int sensorValue3 = phidget.getSensorValue(3);

        if (sensorValue1 > 100 && oldSensorValue1 < 100){

            System.out.println("RIGHT");

            // simulates RIGHT key
            try { 
            Robot robot = new Robot(); 
            robot.keyPress(KeyEvent.VK_RIGHT); 
            } catch (AWTException e) { 
            e.printStackTrace(); 
            }

        } else if (sensorValue2 > 100 && oldSensorValue2 < 100)
        {
            System.out.println("LEFT");

            // simulates LEFT key
            try { 
            Robot robot = new Robot(); 
            robot.keyPress(KeyEvent.VK_LEFT); 
            } catch (AWTException e) { 
            e.printStackTrace(); 
            }
        } else if (sensorValue3 > 100 && oldSensorValue3 < 100)
        {
            System.out.println("ENTER");

            // simulates RIGHT key
            try { 
            Robot robot = new Robot(); 
            robot.keyPress(KeyEvent.VK_RIGHT); 
            } catch (AWTException e) { 
            e.printStackTrace(); 
            }
        }
        oldSensorValue1 = sensorValue1;
        oldSensorValue2 = sensorValue2;
        oldSensorValue3 = sensorValue3;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome this one worked great! It is doing precisely what I wanted! Thank you very much – F4LLCON Oct 11 '12 at 15:10

Set a variable to indicate what the last output was ("LEFT", "RIGHT", etc.). Then, before outputting again, check if the variable is set to the value you are going to output. If it is, skip the output; if not, do the output and reset the variable.

private static final String LEFT = "LEFT";
private static final String RIGHT = "RIGHT";
private static final String ENTER = "ENTER";

String lastOutput = null;
for (i = 0; ; i++) {
    . . .
    if (sensorValue1 > 100){
        if (lastOutput != RIGHT) {
            System.out.println(RIGHT);
            lastOutput = RIGHT;
        }
    . . .
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 best solution here – Baz Oct 11 '12 at 15:11
    
This might have worked, but before seeing this I used the code provided by Tom Gerken. Anyways thank you and +1 – F4LLCON Oct 11 '12 at 15:14

Remove the break statement from all the if conditions. it is removing execution from inside the for loop.

I would just say to reinitialize the sensorvalues inside the IF condition

if (sensorValue1 > 100){ ..... sensorValue1 = 0; }

For sensorValue2

else if (sensorValue2 > 100){ ..... sensorValue2 = 0; }

For sensorValue3

if (sensorValue3 > 100){ ..... sensorValue3 = 0; }

share|improve this answer
    
This did not work, but it is fixed now, thank you anyways +1 – F4LLCON Oct 11 '12 at 15:15

What you need to do is keep track of the button values, and only print RIGHT or LEFT when the button value is below 100, then goes above 100. When the button value is above 100, you need to wait until it goes back down below 100 until you check again for it to go back above.

You'll need to keep some state variables for each button, probably just a boolean like didPrintMessage that you set to true when the button goes above 100, and reset to false when it goes below 100. Then, when the button's value goes above 100, only print LEFT or RIGHT if didPrintMessage is false. Do this before you set didPrintMessage to true.

boolean didPrintMessage1 = false;
boolean didPrintMessage2 = false;
boolean didPrintMessage3 = false;
for (int i = 0; ; i++) {

    // Get the data from analog input 5
    int sensorValue1 = phidget.getSensorValue(1);
    int sensorValue2 = phidget.getSensorValue(2);
    int sensorValue3 = phidget.getSensorValue(3);

    if (sensorValue1 > 100 && !didPrintMessage1) {
        System.out.println("RIGHT");
        /* Robot stuff */
    } else if (sensorValue2 > 100 !didPrintMessage2) {
        System.out.println("LEFT");
        /* Robot stuff */
    } else if (sensorValue3 > 100 !didPrintMessage3) {
        System.out.println("ENTER");
        /* Robot stuff */
    }

    didPrintMessage1 = sensorValue1 > 100;
    didPrintMessage1 = sensorValue2 > 100;
    didPrintMessage1 = sensorValue3 > 100;
}

It looks like this is Java that's running on an embedded system, like a microcontroller. In the future, that would be useful information to have.

share|improve this answer
    
This might have worked, but before seeing this I used the code provided by Tom Gerken. Anyways thank you and +1 – F4LLCON Oct 11 '12 at 15:14

I would simply assign all sensor values to 0 in the end and add one if condition in the beginning. This is will also help you to differentiate if user entered same key two times vs. nothing was entered. I don't see any use of using old value variables.

// Get the data from analog input 5
int sensorValue1 = phidget.getSensorValue(1);
int sensorValue2 = phidget.getSensorValue(2);
int sensorValue3 = phidget.getSensorValue(3);

 if (sensorValue1 == 0 && sensorValue2 == 0 && sensorValue3 ==0){
     /don't do anything
 else if (sensorValue1 > 100 && oldSensorValue1 < 100){
 ......
 ......

In the bottom (out of if-else), add

sensorValue1 = 0;
sensorValue2 = 0;
sensorValue3 = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
This might have worked, but before seeing this I used the code provided by Tom Gerken. Anyways thank you and +1 – F4LLCON Oct 11 '12 at 15:15
    
Its good to know, your problem is resolved. I just tried to simplify the solution by not changing any of your existing conditions and not introducing new variables. Both the answers are conceptually similar :) – Yogendra Singh Oct 11 '12 at 15:18

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