Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to write a loop that will cycle through colors and condense the amount of code in my scss file. Here is a simple example of what I have:

$color1: blue;
$color2: red;
$color3: white;
$color4: black;

.color1-bg { background-color: $color1; }
.color2-bg { background-color: $color2; }

.color1-border { border-color: $color1; }
.color2-border { border-color: $color2; }

And so on.

I am looking for a way to make the equivalent of a foreach loop, and cycle through an 'array' of colours by index. Something like this:

@each $color in $colour1, $colour2, $colour3, $colour4 {
    .#{$color}-bg { background-color: $color; }
    .#{$color}-border { border-color: $color; }
}

I know the syntax is wrong, but that is my thinking process. Thanks for the help!

share|improve this question
1  
Your example seems to have gotten lost. –  ultranaut Oct 11 '12 at 15:16
    
Could you provide an example of the output you desire? Also, the example code does not seem entirely practical. –  cimmanon Oct 11 '12 at 15:32
    
Basically, the client site has "themes" which they want to be color co-ordinated, and they also want to be able to select the colors for a list of colors in their style guide. I am basically letting them select from "color1, color2, color3" etc., and using the classes to display color swatches, and will use their choice as the class prefix. –  Eric Holmes Oct 11 '12 at 15:34
    
I think you just forgot two } - check my answer –  Rockbot Oct 11 '12 at 16:43
    
Fixed my example - see my comment below for why it doesn't work. –  Eric Holmes Oct 11 '12 at 17:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can't access the name of the variable directly, you'd have to store it as an additional value. For example, you could do this:

$color1: ('color1', blue);
$color2: ('color2', red);
$color3: ('color3', white);
$color4: ('color4', black);

@each $color in $color1, $color2, $color3, $color4 {
    $name: nth($color, 1);
    $value: nth($color, 2);
    .#{$name}-bg { background-color: $value; }
    .#{$name}-border { border-color: $value; }
}

Or if your color names are really "color1", "color2", etc., you can also just construct the name on the fly rather than specifying them explicitly:

$color1: blue;
$color2: red;
$color3: white;
$color4: black;

$num: 0;
@each $color in ($color1, $color2, $color3, $color4) {
    $num: $num + 1;
    .color#{$num}-bg { background-color: $color; }
    .color#{$num}-border { border-color: $color; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The color names really are incremented.. no point in defining them, really. This is EXACTLY what I was looking for. Brilliant! Thanks @hopper! –  Eric Holmes Oct 11 '12 at 18:18
1  
You can make nested named lists by alternating separators between commas and spaces. $colorList: "red" $red, "green" $green ; –  Allan Hortle Jan 27 at 22:58

According to the sass-reference your code should look like this, but i haven´t tried it myself.

@each $color in $color1, $color2, $color3, $color4 {
  .#{$color}-bg { background-color: $color;}
  .#{$color}-border { border-color: $color;}
}

http://sass-lang.com/docs/yardoc/file.SASS_REFERENCE.html#control_directives

share|improve this answer
2  
The problem here is that .#{$color}-bg is translating into .white-bg rather than .color1-bg –  Eric Holmes Oct 11 '12 at 17:07

This is more of a comment on the previous answers. It's possible to combine both answers, which results in pretty elegant code (in my not-so-humble opinion).

I use Dutch color names, I do so on purpose as to make clear we're not dealing with HTML color names.

$rood      : #e3004a;
$blauw     : #009ee0;

@each $color in ('rood', $rood), ('blauw', $blauw) {

    $name: nth($color, 1);
    $value: nth($color, 2);

    .#{$name} {
        a{
            background-color: $value;
        }                   
    }
}

CSS

.rood a { background-color: #e3004a; }

.blauw a { background-color: #009ee0; }
share|improve this answer
1  
Side point, but I would avoid using the colour name when naming your variables. –  Alan Shortis Dec 11 '13 at 9:48
    
I actually much prefer using the colour names as the variable. It makes your SASS files much more readable. –  Eric Holmes Dec 11 '13 at 14:19
    
@Ideogram cool concept. I used indexes (colour1-5) so I only had to store the index in the database on a per-entry level (allowed the user to select colour for a post). –  Eric Holmes Dec 11 '13 at 14:20

Ya, this is quite some time from the op, but thought, I'd add it anyway :)

This is what you are looking for with the least amount of repetition. You can just add new colors to your $eric-holmes-colors array and recompile.

$eric-holmes-colors: "blue", "red", "white", "black";

@each $color in $eric-holmes-colors {
    .#{$color}-bg {
        background-color: #{$color};
    }
    .#{$color}-border {
        border-color: #{$color};
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice one. The accepted answer is more what I was looking for, as they were pre-existing colour variables. I also wanted the index to be part of the name (.color1-bg). But thanks! :) –  Eric Holmes Jan 27 at 16:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.