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Why can’t gcc find the random() interface when -std=c99 is set?

I'm new to C, so I just went into man stdlib.h, searched for "random", saw that random() returned long, and, because it's just a learning exercise, thought I'd just cast to int (instead of bothering to look up one which returns int - rand() is the one).

Anyway, the program compiles and runs correctly. But:

$ gcc -std=c99 part1.c
part1.c: In function 'main':
part1.c:44:5: warning: implicit declaration of function 'random'

It goes away if I remove the -std=99 flag. Here is the "offending" code:

  int test6[1000];
  for(i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
  {
    test6[i] = (int) random();
    printf("it is %d\n", test6[i]); //check random() is working (it isn't seeded)
  }
  printf("%d\n", largest(test6, 1000));

So I just wondered if anyone knew why this was, as I thought it might be interesting.

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marked as duplicate by user7116, Nemo, Michael Ratanapintha, Bo Persson, alk Oct 11 '12 at 17:11

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1 Answer 1

You get the warning: implicit function definition message because the function random() isn't declared before you use it. It isn't a standard C function (not in ISO/IEC 9899:2011 or its predecessor versions). You'll need to know which header declares it; you might need to #define something to make the declaration visible.

In C99, you have to declare all functions before using them; that's why the -std=c99 mode objects (though having issued the mandatory diagnostic, it can continue to compile, probably making the backwards-compatible assumption that the function returns an int). In older versions of C, you did not have to pre-declare functions; undeclared functions were implicitly declared as extern int function();, which means 'a function with unspecified (but not variable) argument list that returns an int'. That's why the compilation continues making that assumption; it used to be the standard assumption to make. With C99 and C2011, it is officially an error.


My confusion is that the program still compiles and runs correctly though (random() does return pseudorandoms as well)! I have #include <stdlib.h> at the top of the file. Is it possible that my #include isn't working, but make is doing something clever to work out where to get it? The other thing (which I forgot to put in the question), is that, I thought, the warning initially disappeared when I removed the cast to int. I can't replicate that though, so I guess there must be some other explanation for it. Perhaps I accidentally removed the -std=c99 from the makefile or something.

I said 'Standard C does not define it'; it doesn't, but POSIX does. So, by including the correct header (which is <stdlib.h>), and by ensuring that the declaration is seen, the function is picked up from the C library (which is not a pure Standard C library, but rather contains a lot of POSIX functions too, and a lot of other functions specific to GLIBC). So, it works because the libraries contain the function. You may want/need to compile with -std=gnu99 or specify #define _XOPEN_SOURCE 700 or #define _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200809L or something similar (before you include any system headers) to get the declaration of random() visible under -std=c99. I use a header posixver.h to get the information into my programs.

/*
@(#)File:           $RCSfile: posixver.h,v $
@(#)Version:        $Revision: 1.1 $
@(#)Last changed:   $Date: 2010/08/29 00:27:48 $
@(#)Purpose:        Request appropriate POSIX and X/Open Support
@(#)Author:         J Leffler
*/

#ifndef JLSS_ID_POSIXVER_H
#define JLSS_ID_POSIXVER_H

/*
** Include this file before including system headers.  By default, with
** C99 support from the compiler, it requests POSIX 2001 support.  With
** C89 support only, it requests POSIX 1997 support.  Override the
** default behaviour by setting either _XOPEN_SOURCE or _POSIX_C_SOURCE.
*/

/* _XOPEN_SOURCE 700 is loosely equivalent to _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200809L */
/* _XOPEN_SOURCE 600 is loosely equivalent to _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200112L */
/* _XOPEN_SOURCE 500 is loosely equivalent to _POSIX_C_SOURCE 199506L */

#if !defined(_XOPEN_SOURCE) && !defined(_POSIX_C_SOURCE)
#if __STDC_VERSION__ >= 199901L
#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 600   /* SUS v3, POSIX 1003.1 2004 (POSIX 2001 + Corrigenda) */
#else
#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 500   /* SUS v2, POSIX 1003.1 1997 */
#endif /* __STDC_VERSION__ */
#endif /* !_XOPEN_SOURCE && !_POSIX_C_SOURCE */

#endif /* JLSS_ID_POSIXVER_H */

This is rather conservative and doesn't request POSIX 2008 support because some of the machines I work on don't have that available — still! You can use it as a basis for your version which can be more aggressive if you prefer. I used to have the stanza directly in the programs, but that becomes a nightmare to fix when it is safe to change to POSIX 2008 (and maintaining the comments sensibly in many source files would have been plain silly — so the files usually contained just #define _XOPEN_SOURCE 600 with minimal or no commentary, but it is still a fiddle to change when the time comes to change).

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OK, my confusion is that the program still compiles and runs correctly though (random() does return pseudorandoms as well)! I have #include <stdlib.h> at the top of the file. Is it possible that my #include isn't working, but make is doing something clever to work out where to get it? The other thing (which I forgot to put in the question), is that, I thought, the warning initially disappeared when I removed the cast to int. I can't replicate that though, so I guess there must be some other explanation for it. Perhaps I accidentally removed the -std=c99 from the makefile or something. –  Brendan Oct 11 '12 at 17:48
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