Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created an object as follows.

function StartObj() {
   var events = {
      a: function() {
         alert("hello");
      },
      b = function() {
         lightbox(events.a);
      }
   };

   this.main = function() {
      $("#objId").click(events.b);
   }

}

$(document).ready(function(){
      var _start_obj = new StartObj();
      _start_obj.main();
   });

And in another file,

function lightbox(funcPtr) {
   alert(funcPtr);
}

The alert is reporting funcPtr is undefined; also the google chrome console.

share|improve this question
    
How are you calling it? These are just definitions. (I think your issue might be with what this means inside your b function.) –  Kevin Boucher Oct 11 '12 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You probably don't do what you think you do.

The line var that = this; is useless and this, anyway, isn't really x but the receiver of the x.b function.

This means that if you do

x.b();

this works

but if you do

var f = x.b;
f();

this doesn't work.

If you want to ensure that the working of x.b isn't dependent of the receiver of the function, you may do this :​

var x = function(){
    var x ={
       a: function() {
           alert("hello");
       } 
    };
    x.b = function() {
        mayhem(x.a);
    }
    return x;
}();

An alternative would be to create a constructor and make x using the new operator.


Regarding you edit :

If you want main to be accessible, do this :

function StartObj() {
   var events = {
      a: function() {
         alert("hello");
      }
   };

   events.b = function() {
         lightbox(events.a);
   };

   this.main = function() {
      $("#objId").click(events.b);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you plz review my question ? –  viji Oct 11 '12 at 16:20
    
See edit. But what do you want to alert ? the function code or just "hello" ? –  dystroy Oct 11 '12 at 16:25
    
Actually, the parameter I'm passing inside the function is a callback function which will be called when the lightbox initializes itself. I'm just checking with a function stub. –  viji Oct 11 '12 at 16:28
    
@dystroy: Your last code with the prototype doesn't work, because events is local to the constructor –  Bergi Oct 11 '12 at 16:30
    
@viji so you want this ? : jsfiddle.net/ttEUM –  dystroy Oct 11 '12 at 16:31

Are you sure? this is works for me... I just added the call to x.b() to start it up

var x = {

a: function() {
   alert("hello");
},

b: function() {
       var that = this;
       mayhem(that.a);
    }

}

function mayhem(funcPtr)
{
   funcPtr();
}

x.b();
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not calling x.b straight away. I'm initializing an object and then I'm calling. –  viji Oct 11 '12 at 16:23
    
How you initialize an object? X is a static object.. –  udidu Oct 11 '12 at 16:25

You've screwed up your StartObj constructor - it does not return an object with a main method, main is just a local function. Also, you've got a closing brace too much after the assignment of events.b. This should work:

function StartObj() {
   var events = {
        a: function() {
            alert("hello");
        },
        b: function() {
            lightbox(events.a);
        }
    };

    this.main = function main() {
        $("#objId").click(events.b);
    }   
}

Also, make sure that lightbox is really globally available - check your error console.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey. Thanks for the reply dude. I"ve put the closing bracket properly. But when pasting here, I made a mistake –  viji Oct 11 '12 at 16:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.