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Can a 16-bit machine perform operations on 64-bit data types?

I know that it can perform 32-bit multiplication using two registers, but do not have any idea about how it can handle 64-bit data?

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At the register/machine-code level there is invariably a carry flag that indicates when an arithmetic carry (or borrow) has occurred. This can be used to perform arithmetic operations on an arbitrary number of machine words. It does not necessarily require additional registers since RAM may be used for intermediate storage.

The wider the data type in relation to the machine word, the more instructions are required to perform any particular operation. Performance may also be hit by the need to use RAM rather than registers, so architectures with small or non-orthogonal register sets may perform such operations even slower and require more instructions.

A high level language may provide direct support for such operations. The C language data type long long is typically 64 bit, though you would need to check whether your compiler supports it and what size it is in that implementation. If your compiler provides the C99 stdint.h header and that in turn includes the int64_t data type (and its variants), then the compiler is implicitly capable of generation code for 64 bit operations. Code size, memory usage, and execution time are likley increase of course.

In most C implementations the double data types is 64 bit, even on targets with no FPU.

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What If The Machine Has No RAM , Its Not Mandatory That A CPU Will Have RAM Accompanied , There are many Embedded Systems Which Run Without RAM,BUT This Statement "The wider the data type in relation to the machine word, the more instructions are required to perform any particular operation" Is Highly Accepted – Ragav Oct 12 '12 at 15:07
    
@Ragav: Can you give any concrete examples of a system that has no RAM? I think not, and such a restricted system would hardly need 64 bit operations in any case. I am not referring necessarily to a separate memory device - most microcontrollers have on-chip RAM. – Clifford Oct 12 '12 at 17:16
    
But What About Systems Which Run With Micro Processors – Ragav Oct 15 '12 at 3:18
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@Ragav: What about them? Microprocessor based systems normally have external memory devices. You seem to disagree, but I suggest that it would be unusual if not impractical. If such a system existed, it may indeed be difficult to implement 64 bit operations, but I suggest that it would be difficult to do pretty much any thing useful! Your question was about how it is done; you seem to inventing a hypothetical system just to make it difficult. I am not sure to what purpose. – Clifford Oct 15 '12 at 12:37

What exactly do you mean by "handle"?

Any Turing-complete machine can handle anything, so theoretically the answer to your question is yes. However, the question is how convenient or practical that is.

It seems unlikely that any 16-bit machine has any hardware support for 64-bit operations.

  • If the machine has no support for 64-bit types, it's possible to implement it (in assembly language, C, or whatever other language you use), e.g. using 4 16-bit hardware registers
  • The machine may have no support, but maybe someone has already written libraries that implement it (this was is the case with the old x86 systems, which had good libraries for 64-bit floating-point type double)
  • The machine may have some 64-bit capabilities: the 32-bit ARM has a command SMLALxy that multiplies 16-bit numbers and adds the sum to a 64-bit number
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@Ragav This is the correct answer without more specific information (i.e. platform). As you are new to StackOverflow, please click the green arrow on the left to give credit. :) – Charles Burns Oct 11 '12 at 17:07
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@CharlesBurns: Personally I'd recommend a period of at least 24 hours before accepting any particular answer; you may get a better answer by giving every time-zone a chance to wake up and post. Equally if you believe this answer merits it, you could up-vote it yourself ;-) – Clifford Oct 11 '12 at 20:18
    
@anatolyg: Please Elaborate "If the machine has no support for 64-bit types, it's possible to implement it (in assembly language, C, or whatever other language you use), e.g. using 4 16-bit hardware registers" – Ragav Oct 12 '12 at 7:27
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@Ragav: If it needed elaborating, why did you accept it? This site shows how 16 bit arithmetic can be performed on an 8 bit machine and how the technique is extensible to 24, 32, 48 or any multiple of the machine word width. The technique is equally applicable to larger architectures. – Clifford Oct 12 '12 at 12:58
    
@Clifford Thank You – Ragav Oct 12 '12 at 14:50

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