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c++ why initializer_list behavior for std::vector and std::array are different

I defined simple 2D array (3X2):

  std::array<std::array<int,3>,2> a {
    {1,2,3},
    {4,5,6}
  };

I was surprised this initialization does not work, with gcc4.5 error: too many initializers for 'std::array<std::array<int, 3u>, 2u>'

Why can't I use this syntax?

I found workarounds, one very funny with extra braces, but just wonder why the first, easiest approach is not valid?

Workarounds:

  // EXTRA BRACES
  std::array<std::array<int,3>,2> a {{
    {1,2,3},
    {4,5,6}
  }};

  // EXPLICIT CASTING
  std::array<std::array<int,3>,2> a {
    std::array<int,3>{1,2,3},
    std::array<int,3>{4,5,6}
  };

[UPDATE]

Ok, thanks to KerrekSB and comments I get the difference. So it seems that there is too little braces in my example, like in this C example:

struct B {
  int array[3];
};
struct A {
  B array[2];
};

B b = {{1,2,3}};
A a = {{
     {{1,2,3}},
     {{4,5,6}}
}};
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marked as duplicate by James McNellis, Nicol Bolas, BЈовић, rene, Martin Buberl Oct 11 '12 at 20:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
std::array is an aggregate. –  chris Oct 11 '12 at 16:42
    
I would also expect this to work. BTW another workaround is to omit the inner braces, although it produces warnings on gcc 4.8. –  juanchopanza Oct 11 '12 at 16:47
    
The multidimensional case isn't different from the single-dimensional case, though compiler support may vary. std::array<int, 2> a{1,2}; is ill-formed as well (gcc 4.7.2 will incorrectly accept such code; clang 3.1 will not). See the duplicate to which I linked above. The short answer is: this is a known defect in the C++11 language standard. –  James McNellis Oct 11 '12 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

std::array<T, N> is an aggregate that contains a C array. To initialize it, you need outer braces for the class itself and inner braces for the C array:

std::array<int, 3> a1 = { { 1, 2, 3 } };

Applying this logic to a 2D array gives this:

std::array<std::array<int, 3>, 2> a2 { { { {1, 2, 3} }, { { 4, 5, 6} } } };
//                                   ^ ^ ^ ^            ^ ^
//                                   | | | |            | |
//                                   | +-|-+------------|-+
//                                   +-|-+-|------------+---- C++ class braces
//                                     |   |
//                                     +---+--- member C array braces
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1  
But this works fine: std::array<int,3> a1 { 1, 2, 3 }; ? –  PiotrNycz Oct 11 '12 at 16:56
1  
@PiotrNycz: Only if you're very sloppy and ignore all warnings. My compiler says, warning: missing braces around initialiser for ‘std::array<int, 3u>::value_type [3] {aka int [3]}’ [-Wmissing-braces]. –  Kerrek SB Oct 11 '12 at 17:00
    
I get it now, thanks. I added to my question example with C. –  PiotrNycz Oct 11 '12 at 17:03
    
@PiotrNycz My reading of the standard is that std::array is not required to be implemented as a single element aggregate. I interpret §23.3.2.1 as stating that it can be initialized as per your first example. So I think the single brace syntax if fine. –  juanchopanza Oct 11 '12 at 17:03
    
@juanchopanza James McNellis wrote in comments this is known bug in C++11, maybe we can use single braces some day... –  PiotrNycz Oct 11 '12 at 17:08

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