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I'm trying to draw a line that starts as a thin line and then gadually widens until the end. I need to draw semi-smooth curves (composite out of several straight lines) and I'm having problems finding a way to solve this task.

This fiddle shows my problem:

http://jsfiddle.net/ZvuQG/1/

When you call stroke(), the currently set lineWidth is used to stroke the entire line. My first thought was to draw each line piece individually, but of course, this leaves noticeable gaps in the line at the corners.

What is my best option here? Should I resort to drawing polygons (trapezoids) to get the corners right?

Is there an easier way?

(Edit: Note that I am not trying to actually draw ellipses or any other basic shapes; I'm trying to plot mathematical functions, using line thickness to represent velocity)

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4  
Your best option is probably going to be using bezierCurveTo or quadraticCurveTo and fill instead of stroke, it will complicate the math, but it's likely the only way to get the desired result. I have been able to achieve a similar but different effect by drawing multiple ellipses and offsetting/shrinking them each step: jsfiddle.net/Shmiddty/ZvuQG/3 – Shmiddty Oct 11 '12 at 19:40

Adding rounded line caps and a quadratic curve makes the whole thing look a lot tidier.

See here for example.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good solution, and should have worked, according to the parameters I specified in my question. However, I did not state that I wanted to control the opacity of the line, in which case rounded corners don't look so great: jsfiddle.net/X2Vm7 – Valdemar Oct 19 '12 at 13:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

For those interested, I have come up with two solutions to my problem.

The first idea was to actually draw each point as a corner, using canvas to draw a neat angle. A demo can be seen at:

http://jsfiddle.net/7BkyK/2/

var ctx = document.getElementById('canvas1').getContext('2d');
var points = [null, null, null];

for(var i=0; i<24; i++)
{
    var width = 0.5 + i/2;

    var m = 200;

    var x = Math.cos(i/4) * 180;
    var y = Math.sin(i/4) * 140;

    points[0] = points[1];
    points[1] = points[2];
    points[2] = { X:x, Y:y};

    if(points[0] == null)
        continue;

    var px0 = (points[0].X + points[1].X) / 2;
    var py0 = (points[0].Y + points[1].Y) / 2;

    var px1 = (points[1].X + points[2].X) / 2;
    var py1 = (points[1].Y + points[2].Y) / 2;

    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.lineWidth = width;
    ctx.strokeStyle = "rgba(0,0,0,0.5)";
    ctx.moveTo(m+px0,m+py0);
    ctx.lineTo(m+points[1].X,m+points[1].Y);
    ctx.lineTo(m+px1,m+py1);
    ctx.stroke();
}
​

The second and much prettier solution, as suggested by Shmiddty, is to use bezier curves. This proved to be a great solution:

http://jsfiddle.net/Ssrv9/1/

// 1.
// Varying line width, stroking each piece of line separately
var ctx = document.getElementById('canvas1').getContext('2d');
var points = [null, null, null, null];

for(var i=-1; i<25; i = i +1)
{
    var width = 0.5 + i/2;

    var m = 200;


    var x = Math.cos(i/4) * 180;
    var y = Math.sin(i/4) * 140;

    points[0] = points[1];
    points[1] = points[2];
    points[2] = { X:x, Y:y};

    if(points[0] == null)
        continue;


    var p0 = points[0];
    var p1 = points[1];
    var p2 = points[2];

    var x0 = (p0.X + p1.X) / 2;
    var y0 = (p0.Y + p1.Y) / 2;

    var x1 = (p1.X + p2.X) / 2;
    var y1 = (p1.Y + p2.Y) / 2;

    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.lineWidth = width;
    ctx.strokeStyle = "black";

    ctx.moveTo(m+x0, m+y0);
    ctx.quadraticCurveTo(m+p1.X, m+p1.Y, m+x1, m+y1);
    ctx.stroke();
}

share|improve this answer

Another way you can solve this is to consider each of you plot points to be a circle of a radius determined by the velocity.

plot paths joining the profile-edges of these circles (straight or curved, your choice), first over the top, round the last and back to the start on the underside. Then fill the path at the end.

This should give you a smooth line expanding and contracting as it approaches you plot point 'circles'.

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