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Write the declaration for class B. The class’s members should be as follows:

m, an integer. This variable should not be accessible to code outside the class or to any class that extends class B.

n, an integer. This variable should be accessible only to classes that extend class B or in the same package as class B.

setM, getM, setN, and getN. These are the mutator and accessor methods for the member variables m and n. These methods should be accessible to code outside the class. calc. This is a public abstract method.

Next, write the declaration for class D, which extends class B. The class’s members should be as follows: q, a double. This variable should not be accessible to code outside the class. r, a double. This variable should be accessible to any class that extends class D or in the same package. setQ, getQ, setR, and getR. These are the mutator and accessor methods for the member variables q and r. These methods should be accessible to code outside the class. calc, a public method that overrides the superclass’s abstract calc method. This method should return the value of q times r.

Here is my code the stared ones is the part I got wrong -

import java.io.*;
public class ClassB{

   ***private int m;
   public int n;***
  public setM(int minteger){
      m=minteger;
   }
   public void getM(){
      return minteger;
   }
   public setN(int ninteger){
      n=ninteger;
   }
   ***public void getN(){
      return ninteger
   }***
}

public class ClassD extends ClassB
{
   private double q;
   ***public double r;***

  public setQ(double qdouble){
      q=qdouble;
   }
   public void getQ(){
      return qdouble;
   }
   public setR(double rdouble){
      r=rdouble;
   }
   public void getR(){
      return rdouble
   }
}
   ***public abstract class calc{
   return r*q
   }***
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closed as not a real question by dystroy, Mark, Kay, David Grant, dSquared Oct 11 '12 at 19:31

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

make int n and double r as protected . In getN() you should write return n;Similarly in getM() write return m;, getQ() write return q; and in getR() write return r;

You abstract class should look like:

 public abstract Calculator{
      public abstract calc();
 }

You didn't clearly mention where to use/override calc method

share|improve this answer
    
as protected you mean private double r?? –  Chaz32621 Oct 11 '12 at 16:58
    
No protected is different from private When you make a variable protected it means "this variable is accessible to any class that extends the class in which it is declared or any class in the same package" –  Abubakkar Rangara Oct 11 '12 at 17:01
    
wonderful thanks I forgot all about the protected option so use to just private and public haha thanks great help!!! –  Chaz32621 Oct 11 '12 at 17:04

Write the declaration for class B.

The class’s members should be as follows: m, an integer. This variable should not be accessible to code outside the class or to any class that extends class B.*

m must be private (also q)

n, an integer. This variable should be accessible only to classes that extend class B or in the same package as class B.

n must be protected (also r)

calc. This is a public abstract method.

Having an abstract method in Class B requires Class B to be an abstract class. Class B should define the abstract method calc which is implemented in Class D. Be careful to use the private or protected member in the return statement, so return m instead of return minteger, for example. As for calc:

    public abstract class Class_B{

    private int m;
    protected int n;

      //insert mutator and accessor methods

    public abstract double calc();
    }

    public class Class_D extends Class_B{

    private double q;
    protected double r;

      //insert mutator and accessor methods

    @Override
    public double calc() {
        return q*r;
    }
}
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Since in Class B m should not be accessible to any other class it should be private int m. Make int n and double r as protected. getN accessor should be

public int getN()
{
return n;
}

getM should also be

public int getM()
{
return m;
}

The other two accessor methods for getQ and getR should also have return type double. Your abstract class should look like

public abstract Calculator
{
public abstract cal();
}

For more access details study Oracle tutorial

share|improve this answer
class B
{

    private int m;

    protected int n;

    public int getM()
    {
        return m;
    }

    public void setM(int m)
    {
        this.m = m;
    }

    public int getN()
    {
        return n;
    }

    public void setN(int n)
    {
        this.n = n;
    }
}




class D extends B
{

    private double q;

    double r;

    public double getQ()
    {
        return q;
    }

    public void setQ(double q)
    {
        this.q = q;
    }

    public double getR()
    {
        return r;
    }

    public void setR(double r)
    {
        this.r = r;
    }
}

Here I want to tell you something about some access modifiers in java class declaration. There are 4 of them: public/default/protected/private

As you may know public means this field of the class can be accessed(read/write) from anywhere. default exists but isn't explicitly used

int a;

when there is no other modifier in front that means it uses the default modifier, this is the one you said "accessible only to classes that extend class B or in the same package as class".

protected is the privilege which can only be accessed by this class or the classes which extend this class.

private is the most strict modifier in java, this means that the field or method can only be accessed by objects of the class only. The classes which inherit from this class can not access these fields or methods.

Another thing to be noted is that a subclass can override the super class' method if this method is not private.

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