Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To read i tried this code:

In the top of Form1 i did:

Dictionary<string, List<string>> LocalyKeyWords = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>();

In the constructor i did:

keywords = @"d:\Keywords.txt";
            if (File.Exists(keywords))
            {
                LoadKeys(LocalyKeyWords, keywords);
            }

The function LoadKeys:

private void LoadKeys(Dictionary<string,List<string>> disctionary, string FileName)
        {
            var lines = File.ReadAllLines(keywords).Select(l => l.Split(','));
            var dict = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>();
            foreach(var splits in lines)
            {
                var key = splits.First();
                var value = splits.Skip(1).ToList();
                try {dict.Add(key, value);
                }
                catch(Exception ex)
                {  } } 
        }

No exceptions but in the constructor after calling the function and all is done the LocalyKeyWords is empty.


This is how im writing to the file today the keys and values:

private void button6_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

            using (var w = new StreamWriter(keywords))
            {
                crawlLocaly1 = new CrawlLocaly();
                crawlLocaly1.StartPosition = FormStartPosition.CenterParent;
                DialogResult dr = crawlLocaly1.ShowDialog(this);
                if (dr == DialogResult.OK)
                {
                    if (LocalyKeyWords.ContainsKey(mainUrl))
                    {
                        LocalyKeyWords[mainUrl].Clear();
                        LocalyKeyWords[mainUrl].Add(crawlLocaly1.getText());
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        LocalyKeyWords[mainUrl] = new List<string>();
                        LocalyKeyWords[mainUrl].Add(crawlLocaly1.getText());
                    }
                    foreach (KeyValuePair<string, List<string>> kvp in LocalyKeyWords)
                    {
                        w.WriteLine(kvp.Key + "," + string.Join(",", kvp.Value));
                    }
                }
            } 
        }

Maybe now you will be able to solve the loading the keys and values in the constructor and also to solve the problem how to write each time im doing a change of the keys or values in the button6 click event.

share|improve this question
    
Do you need the mentioned format of the text in the file? Else you could use DataContractSerializer to serialize/deserialize the Dictionary. (While keeping the file in a human readable format) –  rudolf_franek Oct 11 '12 at 17:07
    
Your LoadKeys function is not updating the passed in Dictionary (disctionary), but rather, a local variable dict. –  Jon Senchyna Oct 11 '12 at 18:14
1  
I'm not sure how you're getting duplicate keys in your file if that is the code used to generate it. Do any of your keys contain a comma? If so, that may be causing the duplicate-keys issue. In that case, you will need to either escape out the commas in your keys, or use a new delimiter in your file. –  Jon Senchyna Oct 11 '12 at 19:01
    
Jon Senchyna the key are not containing commas the keys are: for example googl.com then , then the value google here is how the output in the text file is looke like: google.com,daniel google.com,test ynet.co.il,ynet key,value(google.com is the key then , then the value wich is daniel ) –  Daniel Lip Oct 11 '12 at 19:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
string line = System.String.Empty;
using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader("MyFile.txt")
{
    while ((line = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
         string[] tokens = line.Split(',');    
         LocalKeyWords.Add(tokesn[0], tokens[1]);
    }
}

You should probably wrap that in a try catch as well.

share|improve this answer
    
evanmcdonnal tried your code and getting error on: LocalyKeyWords.Add(tokens[0], tokens[1]); the error is: ErroArgument 2: cannot convert from 'string' to 'System.Collections.Generic.List<string> and : Error 1 The best overloaded method match for 'System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<string,System.Collections.Generic.List<st‌​ring>>.Add(string, System.Collections.Generic.List<string>)' has some invalid arguments –  Daniel Lip Oct 11 '12 at 17:04
    
Your code does not get the full value for each key. The values are actually List<string>s. You want to set the value to a list containing every token after the first. –  Jon Senchyna Oct 11 '12 at 17:05
    
This is incorrect, the just uses the second argument as the value in the dictionary when the dictionary requires a list of the,. –  Dharun Oct 11 '12 at 17:06
    
@Daniel: you need to use tokens.Skip(1).ToList() instead of tokens[1]. –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:06
1  
@Daniel: than there is a problem in your file where you read the information from: there must be no duplicate keys, as you are dumping a dictionary! –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:21
var lines = File.ReadAllLines("path/to/file").Select(l => l.Split(','));
var dict = new Dictionary<string, List<string>();
foreach(var splits in lines) 
{
    var key = splits.First();
    var value = splits.Skip(1).ToList();
    try {dict.Add(key, value);}
    catch(Exception ex) { //TODO: handle }
}
return dict;
share|improve this answer
    
Dharun tried your code but when running the program im getting error on the line: var dict = lines.ToDictionary(g => g.First(), g => g.Skip(1).ToList()); say: Argument exception: An item with the same key has already been added. –  Daniel Lip Oct 11 '12 at 17:08
    
You have a line with the same key. I'm going to revert to my previous answer which you can try/catch –  Dharun Oct 11 '12 at 17:09
    
Dharun tried your edited code same error im getting. –  Daniel Lip Oct 11 '12 at 17:09
    
@DanielLip try it now –  Dharun Oct 11 '12 at 17:11
    
catch (Exception) is somehow, well, not recommended. –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:15

If you have a very large file, strongly suggest using ReadLines rather than ReadAllLines, ReadLines is deferred execution and does not load all lines into memory, ReadAllLines is not optimized much when loading all lines into memory:

var result = File.ReadLines("text.txt")
                 .Select(line => line.Split(','))
                 .ToDictionary(x => x.First(),
                               x => x.Skip(1).ToList());

In case you have the same key, Dictionary is not good option, instead you can use:

var result = File.ReadLines("text.txt")
            .Select(line => line.Split(','))
            .Select(x => new KeyValuePair<string, List<string>>(x.First(), x.Skip(1).ToList()));
share|improve this answer
2  
It's a shame that you split twice. –  Yorye Nathan Oct 11 '12 at 17:01
2  
@Yorye: well, one just needs an intermediate Select. :) –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:02
1  
@Vlad One should edit in an intermediate Select. –  Yorye Nathan Oct 11 '12 at 17:02
1  
I would suggest .Select(l => l.Split(",').ToDictionary(parts => .... –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:04
    
@Vlad: good suggestion –  Cuong Le Oct 11 '12 at 17:06

Building upon an above suggestion, this will group together any duplicate keys and give you the unique values for each one.

           // Turn the file into an Enumerable of lines
var dict = File.ReadLines("path/to/file")
           // For each line, turn it into an array of comma-separated values
           .Select(line => line.Split(','))
           // Group the lines together by their first token (the key)
           // The values of the groupings will be the "tokenized" lines
           .GroupBy(line => line[0])
           // Create a dictionary from the collection of lines, 
           // using the Key from the grouping (the first token)
           .ToDictionary(group => group.Key,
                         // Set the values of each entry to the arrays
                         // of tokens found for each key (merging 
                         // them together if a key was found multiple times)
                         group => group.SelectMany(values => 
                                  // ...ignoring the first token and filtering
                                  // out duplicate values
                                  values.Skip(1).Distinct().ToList()));
return dict;

For example, a file containing the following text:

1,a,b,c
1,c,d,e
2,e,f,g

Would be converted into the following dictionary:

1 : {a,b,c,d,e}
2 : {e,f,g}

As pointed out by @Vlad, you shouldn't need to filter out any duplicates, as the file should be generated from a Dictionary, and should not contain duplicates. I would strongly recommend figuring out why your file has duplicates, and fixing that issue. You could then drastically simplify the function that loads your file into a dictionary, removing the grouping and the Distinct call, leaving you with the following:

var dict = File.ReadLines("path/to/file")
           // For each line, turn it into an array of comma-separated values
           .Select(line => line.Split(','))
           // Create a dictionary from the collection of lines, 
           // using the the first token as the key
           .ToDictionary(tokens => tokens[0],
                         // Set the value of each entry to the a
                         // list containing each token on that line
                         // (after the first, which is the key)
                         tokens => tokens.Skip(1).ToList());
return dict;
share|improve this answer
    
duplicate keys should be an error, the file must contain a dump of a dictionary. –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:25
    
and you actually don't need Distinct. –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:26
    
You're correct that the file should be a dump of a dictionary. I made this suggestion because the OP was getting duplicate key errors when loading a file, which suggests that it there could be duplicates (manually-created file perhaps). Distinct is being used here in case the file contains the same value multiple times for the same key, an example of which is shown in the example text file. –  Jon Senchyna Oct 11 '12 at 17:38
    
in the original version of the question, the OP showed the code which created the file by dumpling a Dictionary<string, List<String>>. This implies that (1) having duplicates is strongly a mistake, (2) each of the List<string> keys may already contain duplicates by itself, so Distinct still seems to be not correct to me. –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 18:08
    
I will update my question with how im writing creating the file today maybe it will help you all to understand ? –  Daniel Lip Oct 11 '12 at 18:31

Well, for reading basically you do the opposite thing as for writing.

You open the file (var w = new StreamReader(keywords)), read it line by line (while (w.Peek() >= 0) { var l = sr.ReadLine()); ... (or even better string l; while ((l = sr.ReadLine()) != null) { ...), and parse each line.

For parsing a line, you can use string.Split to split it by comma, so your key is the 0th entry in the list of parts, and the rest is the value.

Edit: added alternate solution without Peek, thanks to @Jon.

share|improve this answer
1  
@downvoter: care to comment? –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:00
    
(Not the downvoter) You don't need to call w.Peek(). ReadLine() returns null when it gets to the end of a file, and an empty string for an actual blank line. Using Peek and ReadLine causes your code to make more reads than it needs to, affecting performance in larger files. –  Jon Senchyna Oct 11 '12 at 17:09
    
@Jon: actually, Peek doesn't has a negligible overhead, the data is anyway buffered. And we anyway need that data for the upcoming GetLine. Usage of Peek comes from the actual MSDN example. –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:11
    
@Jon: s/doesn't has/has/ –  Vlad Oct 11 '12 at 17:22
    
Fair enough. I typically see storing the result of ReadLine() in a string, then looping until the string becomes null, setting the value of the string to ReadLine() again at the end of each loop iteration. I guess both ways work. I think Peek() is still (at least slightly) less performant than just ReadLine(), since the "just ReadLine()" method is the same set of instructions, without a call to Peek and using a != null check, rather than a > -1 check. –  Jon Senchyna Oct 11 '12 at 17:29

Code:

var delimiter = new[] {','};

var splits = File.ReadLines("text.txt")
                 .Where(line => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(line))
                 .Select(line => line.Split(delimiter));
                 // Add "StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries" if you want
                 // Add ".Where(split => split.Length > 1)" to exclude empty keys

var lookup = splits.ToLookup(split => split[0], split => split.Skip(1));
var dict = lookup.ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.SelectMany(s => s).ToList());

Less debug-friendly, but less lines:

var dict = File.ReadLines("text.txt")
               .Where(line => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(line))
               .Select(line => line.Split(delimiter))
               .ToLookup(split => split[0], split => split.Skip(1))
               .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.SelectMany(s => s).ToList());

Example input:

1, a, b, c

2, a, b, c

1, a, e, d

3

2, a

4, a, b

Output:

1: {a, b, c, a, e, d}

2: {a, b, c, a}

3: {}

4: {a, b}

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.