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I need to write a function that calculates the sum of all numbers n.

Row 1:          1 
Row 2:         2 3 
Row 3:        4 5 6 
Row 4:       7 8 9 10 
Row 5:     11 12 13 14 15 
Row 6:   16 17 18 19 20 21 

It helps to imagine the above rows as a 'number triangle.' The function should take a number, n, which denotes how many numbers as well as which row to use. Row 5's sum is 65. How would I get my function to do this computation for any n-value?

For clarity's sake, this is not homework. It was on a recent midterm and needless to say, I was stumped.

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4  
Hint: see the regularity in the leftmost numbers of each row? 1,2,4,7,11,16,... – Junuxx Oct 11 '12 at 17:12
1  
oeis.org/A006003 – OrangeDog Oct 11 '12 at 18:36
up vote 14 down vote accepted

The leftmost number in column 5 is 11 = (4+3+2+1)+1 which is sum(range(5))+1. This is generally true for any n.

So:

def triangle_sum(n):
    start = sum(range(n))+1
    return sum(range(start,start+n))

As noted by a bunch of people, you can express sum(range(n)) analytically as n*(n-1)//2 so this could be done even slightly more elegantly by:

def triangle_sum(n):
    start = n*(n-1)//2+1
    return sum(range(start,start+n))
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1  
I would say the second version is actually slightly less elegant, but slightly more efficient. – fletom Oct 11 '12 at 18:33
    
+1 nice solution. – Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 11 '12 at 18:36

A solution that uses an equation, but its a bit of work to arrive at that equation.

def sumRow(n):
    return (n**3+n)/2
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1  
best i could think of – Rahul Gautam Oct 11 '12 at 17:32
    
I think there is no need for the 'conversion to double than back to int'-idea, as n**3 and n will always have the same parity, thus their sum is always even. You can just simply return (n**3+n)/2 instead. – elias Mar 22 '14 at 10:33
    
@elias I believe you are correct. Im not sure why I thought I had to convert to double first. – Matt Mar 22 '14 at 15:15

The numbers 1, 3, 6, 10, etc. are called triangle numbers and have a definite progression. Simply calculate the two bounding triangle numbers, use range() to get the numbers in the appropriate row from both triangle numbers, and sum() them.

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Here is a generic solution:

start=1
n=5
for i in range(n):
    start += len (range(i))
answer=sum(range(start,start+n))

As a function:

def trio(n):
    start=1
    for i in range(n):
            start += len (range(i))
    answer=sum(range(start,start+n))
    return answer
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def sum_row(n):
    final = n*(n+1)/2
    start = final - n
    return final*(final+1)/2 - start*(start+1)/2

or maybe

def sum_row(n):
    final = n*(n+1)/2
    return sum((final - i) for i in range(n))

How does it work:

The first thing that the function does is to calculate the last number in each row. For n = 5, it returns 15. Why does it work? Because each row you increment the number on the right by the number of the row; at first you have 1; then 1+2 = 3; then 3+3=6; then 6+4=10, ecc. This impy that you are simply computing 1 + 2 + 3 + .. + n, which is equal to n(n+1)/2 for a famous formula.

then you can sum the numbers from final to final - n + 1 (a simple for loop will work, or maybe fancy stuff like list comprehension) Or sum all the numbers from 1 to final and then subtract the sum of the numbers from 1 to final - n, like I did in the formula shown; you can do better with some mathematical operations

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def compute(n):
   first = n * (n - 1) / 2 + 1
   last = first + n - 1
   return sum(xrange(first, last + 1))
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