Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After some reading, I found myself struggling with two different approaches to pass a list of arguments to a function. I read some indications. That's what I figured out so far:

Actual code:

file caller.py:

import worker
worker.version_check(iserver,login,password,proxyUser,proxyPass,
  proxyServer,packageInfo)

worker.version_get(iserver,login,password,proxyUser,proxyPass,
  proxyServer,packageInfo)

worker.version_send(iserver,login,password,proxyUser,proxyPass,
  proxyServer,packageInfo)

File: worker.py:

def version_check(iserver,login,password,proxyUser,proxyPass,proxyServer,service):
    #code and more code

def version_get(iserver,login,password,proxyUser,proxyPass,proxyServer,service):
     #code and more code

def version_send(iserver,login,password,proxyUser,proxyPass,proxyServer,service):
    #code and more code

And now I have:

file caller.py:

import worker
args = (env, family, host, password, prefix, proxyServer,
        proxyUser, proxyPass, option, jokerVar
       )
worker.version_check(*args)
worker.version_get(*args)
worker.version_send(*args)

File: worker.py:

def version_check(*args):
  env = args[0]
  family = args[1]
  host = args[2]
  password = args[3]
  prefix = args[4]
  proxyServer = args[5]
  proxyUser = args[6]
  proxyPass = args[7]
  option = args[8]
  jokerVar = args[9]

  #code and more code

def version_get((*args):
  env = args[0]
  family = args[1]
  host = args[2]
  password = args[3]
  prefix = args[4]
  proxyServer = args[5]
  proxyUser = args[6]
  proxyPass = args[7]
  option = args[8]
  jokerVar = args[9]

  #code and more code

def version_send(*args):
  env = args[0]
  family = args[1]
  host = args[2]
  password = args[3]
  prefix = args[4]
  proxyServer = args[5]
  proxyUser = args[6]
  proxyPass = args[7]
  option = args[8]
  jokerVar = args[9]

  #code and more code

Using the old approach (actual code) I believe it is more "friendly" to call a function in one line only (as you can see on worker.py). But, using the new approach, I think the code get more extensive because for each function I have to define all the same variables. But is this the best practice? I'm still learning Python on a slow curve, so, sorry for any mistakes in the code.

And one important thing, most of the variables are retrieved from a database, so they are not stactic.

share|improve this question
5  
Generally, when you end up with functions with that many arguments, you need to think about your design some more. Would passing an object be better than that many arguments? –  Martijn Pieters Oct 11 '12 at 17:16
    
@MartijnPieters It is possible to send me an example? meanwhile i will try to find it also on s.o. and python documentation. –  Thales Oct 11 '12 at 17:20
1  
What do the set of arguments represent? Can that be named? If so, make it a namedtuple or custom class to hold that information, then you have one object to pass around instead of x separate arguments. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 11 '12 at 17:22
    
for a simple example, most arguments are retrieved from the database.For example, i send the input env , that could be dev, tests or prod. depending of the environment, it would retrieve all values for the other variables. –  Thales Oct 11 '12 at 17:25
    
if many functions use the same arguments then you could convert them into methods of an object. In your case two objects could be used: a client that is responsible for transport and a concrete service (VersionInfo) that has get, check, set methods built on top of the client. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 11 '12 at 18:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I really don't recommend defining functions like def version_check(*args): unless you specifically need to. Quick, without reading the source: what order are the arguments in? How do you specify a default value for proxyServer? Remember, "explicit is better than implicit".

The one time I routinely deviate from that rule is when I'm wrapping another function like:

def foo(bar):
    print 'Bar:', bar

def baz(qux, *args):
    print 'Qux:', qux
    foo(*args)

I'd never do it for such a simple example, but suppose foo is a function from a 3rd-party package outside my control with lots of defaults, keyword arguments, etc. In that case, I'd rather punt the argument parsing to Python than attempt it myself.

Personally, I'd write that as a class like:

class Worker(object):
    def __init__(iserver,login,password,proxyUser,proxyPass,proxyServer,service):
        self.iserver = iserver
        self.login = login
        self.password = password
        self.proxyUser = proxyUser
        self.proxyPass = proxyPass
        self.proxyServer = proxyServer
        self.service = service

    def version_check(self): ...

    def version_get(self): ...

    def version_send(self): ...

And then in the client, write:

from worker import Worker

w = Worker(iserver,login,password,proxyUser,proxyPass,proxyServer,service)
w.version_check()
w.version_get()
w.version_send()

If you really need to write functions with lots of arguments instead of encapsulating that state in a class - which is a more typically Pythonic way to do it - then consider the namedtuple datatype from recent Python versions. It lets you specify a tuple where items are addressable by keyword and can make for some very clean, elegant code.

share|improve this answer
    
+1! This is a great answer. You gave the same solution I would have given (encapsulating the functions and data in a class) and gave a very clear explanation for why the original version is not as good. –  Blckknght Oct 11 '12 at 18:05
    
+1 you could also create more than one object –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 11 '12 at 18:08
    
@Blckknght Thanks! I try. :-) –  Kirk Strauser Oct 11 '12 at 18:45
    
@J.F.Sebastian That's also a great approach and I've used that many times, where I'd write something like worker.version_check(serverobj). –  Kirk Strauser Oct 11 '12 at 18:46
    
item 2.3 in @Francis' answer is exactly what I mean –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 12 '12 at 1:59

There are many approaches, depending on what those arguments represent.

  1. If they are just a grab-bag of arguments (especially if some are optional), use keyword arguments:

    myargs = {'iserver':'server','login':'username','password':'Pa2230rd'}
    version_get(**myargs)
    
  2. If they represent some thing with its own state, then use classes:

    1. If the arguments represent a single state that your functions are modifying, then accept the arguments in the object constructor and make your version_* methods functions of that class:

      class Version(object):
          def __init__(self,iserver,login,password,
                       proxyUser,proxyPass,proxyServer,service):
              self.iserver = iserver
              self.login = login
              #etc
          def check(self):
              self.iserver
          def get(self):
              pass
          #etc
      myversion = Version('iserver','login',...)
      myversion.check()
      
    2. If you have some kind of resource those arguments represent that your functions are merely using, in that case use a separate class, and supply it as an object parameter to your functions:

      class Connection(Object):
          def __init__(self, iserver, ...):
              self.iserver # etc
      
      myconn = Connection('iserver',...)
      
      version_check(myconn)
      
    3. Most likely, these are two different resources and should be two classes. In this case you can combine these approaches:

      #Connection() class as above
      class Version(object):
          def __init__(self, connection):
              self.connection = connection
          def check(self):
              self.connection.iserver # ....
      
      myconn = Connection('iserver', ...)
      conn_versioner = Version(myconn)
      conn_versioner.check()
      
    4. Possibly, your arguments represent more than one object (e.g., a connection and a transparent proxy object) In that case, try to create an object with the smallest public interface methods like version_* would need and encapsulate the state represented by the other arguments using object composition.

      For example, if you have proxy connections, you can create a Connection() class which just knows about server, login and password, and a ConnectionProxy() class which has all the methods of a Connection, but forwards to another Connection object. This allows you to separate the proxy* arguments, and means that your version_* functions can be ignorant of whether they're using a proxy or not.

  3. If your arguments are just state and don't have any methods proper to them, consider using a namedtuple(). This will act like a smarter tuple (including tuple unpacking, slicing, etc) and have minimal impact on your existing code while still being easier to use.

    Connection = namedtuple('Connection', 'iserver login password etc')
    myconn = Connection('iserver', 'loginname', 'passw3rd')
    version_check(*myconn)
    
share|improve this answer

You can create instance an object or define a class. e.g.

file caller.py:

import worker

info=object()
info.env=0
info.family='something'
info.host='something'
info.password='***'
info.prefix=''
info.proxyServer=''
info.proxyUser=''
info.proxyPass=''
info.option=''
info.jokerVar=''

worker.version_check(info)
worker.version_get(info)
worker.version_send(info)

file worker.py:

def version_check(info):
    #you may access values from info
    #code and more code

def version_get(info):
    #code and more code

def version_send(info):
    #code and more code
share|improve this answer
    
you can't set arbitrary attributes on object directly. class Info: pass could be used instead. Anyway this approuch is no better than simply using keyword arguments, see item 1 in @Francis' answer –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 12 '12 at 15:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.