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So I am working on a project where I get some data out of a database - there are two pieces of data that make this project nice, one I have the type (they call them events but it essentially just translates to .NET type I created) and then I have XML and I designed the objects so they just deserialize nicely. All this is wonderful, unit tested and all the classes and methods follow the single responsibility principle.

Where my architecture skills get fuzzy is when I am creating the factory to build the business logic to process the .NET objects I have created from the XML.

Basically this is what I have.

  public class EventProcessorFactory : IEventProcessorFactory
    {
        private readonly List<IEventProcessor> _eventProcessors;

        public EventProcessorFactory()
        {
            _eventProcessors = new List<IEventProcessor>();
        }

        public IEventProcessor GetProcessor(Type eventType)
        {
            var typeOfEventProcessor = GetProcessorFromEventType(eventType);
            if (_eventProcessors.Any(x => x.GetType() == typeOfEventProcessor))
                return _eventProcessors.Single(x => x.GetType() == typeOfEventProcessor);
            var processor = BuildProcessorFromType(typeOfEventProcessor);
            _eventProcessors.Add(processor);
            return processor;
        }

        private static Type GetProcessorFromEventType(Type eventType)
        {
            if (eventType == typeof(EnrollmentEventType))
                return typeof(EnrollmentEventProcessor);
            if (eventType == typeof(ClaimantAccountInfoEventType))
                return typeof(ClaimantAccountInfoEventProcessor);
            if (eventType == typeof(PhoneUpdateEventType))
                return typeof(PhoneUpdateEventProcessor);
            if (eventType == typeof(AddressUpdateEventType))
                return typeof(AddressUpdateEventProcessor);
            if (eventType == typeof(ClientAccountInfoEventType))
                return typeof(ClientAccountInfoEventProcessor);
            return null;
        }

        private IEventProcessor BuildProcessorFromType(Type typeOfEventProcessor)
        {
            return ((IEventProcessor)Activator.CreateInstance(typeOfEventProcessor));
        }
    }

So that works but it seems pretty clunky. I have read some articles about using factories but either I didn't read the right one or I am not getting it. I have two problems with the code above.

1) If you add a new event you need to go modify it, I would the later developers to be able to just drop "MyCoolNewEventType" and "MyCoolNewEventProcessor" and not have to modify the method that matches up the event to the processor.

2) I right now when I create an instance am able to just call .CreateInstance(); That's fine cause I don't have any dependencies but the "event processors" are probably going to have dependencies at least on the data base. I am not 100% sure how to handle that, I don't want random calls to Container.Resolve().

If anyone can point in the right direction that would be tremendous.

share|improve this question
    
How evenType relates with EventProccessor? Why EventType is not enum? – Cuong Le Oct 11 '12 at 17:31
    
Could you please explain the second problem a little bit more? Then i going to add it to my answer. – Felix K. Oct 11 '12 at 17:38
    
I up voted all of these because they all worked in some form, in the end I changed my solution to use attributes but depending on someones situation all these versions are valid. – Kenn Oct 17 '12 at 12:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sort of depends where you want to store the mappings, but you could write a custom config section:

public class EventProcessorMapping : ConfigurationElement
{

    [ConfigurationProperty("event", IsRequired = true)]
    public string Event
    {
        get
        {
            return this["event"] as string;
        }
    }

    [ConfigurationProperty("processor", IsRequired = true)]
    public string Processor
    {
        get
        {
            return this["processor"] as string;
        }
    }
}

[ConfigurationCollection(typeof(EventProcessorMapping), CollectionType = ConfigurationElementCollectionType.AddRemoveClearMap)]
public class EventProcessors : ConfigurationElementCollection
{
    public EventProcessorMapping this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return BaseGet(index) as EventProcessorMapping;
        }
        set
        {
            if (BaseGet(index) != null)
            {
                BaseRemoveAt(index);
            }
            BaseAdd(index, value);
        }
    }

    protected override ConfigurationElement CreateNewElement()
    {
        return new EventProcessorMapping();
    }

    protected override object GetElementKey(ConfigurationElement element)
    {
        return ((EventProcessorMapping)element).Event;
    }
}

public class RegisterEventProcessorsConfig : ConfigurationSection
{

    public static RegisterEventProcessorsConfig GetConfig()
    {
        return (RegisterEventProcessorsConfig)ConfigurationManager.GetSection("RegisterEventProcessors") ?? new RegisterEventProcessorsConfig();
    }

    [ConfigurationProperty("EventProcessors")]
    public EventProcessors EventProcessors
    {
        get
        {
            var o = this["EventProcessors"];
            return o as EventProcessors;
        }
    }

}

Then in your App.config you can have:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <configSections>
    <section name="RegisterEventProcessors" type="UnitTestProject1.RegisterEventProcessorsConfig, UnitTestProject1"></section>
  </configSections>

  <RegisterEventProcessors>
    <EventProcessors>
      <add event="UnitTestProject1.ClaimantAccountInfoEventType, UnitTestProject1" processor="UnitTestProject1.ClaimantAccountInfoEventProcessor, UnitTestProject1" />
      <add event="UnitTestProject1.EnrollmentEventType, UnitTestProject1" processor="UnitTestProject1.EnrollmentEventProcessor, UnitTestProject1" />
    </EventProcessors>
  </RegisterEventProcessors>
</configuration>

So, that at least repositions the mapping configuration. As for the factory, if you don't mind the Processor classes being instantiated when the factory is made, you could do:

public class EventProcessorFactory : IEventProcessorFactory
{
    private readonly Dictionary<Type, IEventProcessor> _eventProcessors;

    public EventProcessorFactory(IEnumerable<EventProcessorMapping> eventProcessorMappings)
    {
        _eventProcessors = new Dictionary<Type, IEventProcessor>();
        foreach (var mapping in eventProcessorMappings)
        {
            AddMapping(Type.GetType(mapping.Event), Type.GetType(mapping.Processor));
        }
    }

    public IEventProcessor GetProcessor<T>() where T : IEventType
    {
        return _eventProcessors[typeof(T)];
    }

    private void AddMapping(Type eventType, Type processorType)
    {
        var processor = (IEventProcessor)Activator.CreateInstance(processorType);
        _eventProcessors[eventType] = processor;
    }
}

In the constructor, we are passing in a collection of the mapping config elements, and the processors are created right then and stored in the private collection. Then getting the processor from the factory is basically just a dictionary lookup.

The two parts come together like this:

[TestMethod]
public void TestFactory()
{
    var config = RegisterEventProcessorsConfig.GetConfig();
    var factory = new EventProcessorFactory(config.EventProcessors.Cast<EventProcessorMapping>());

    var processor = factory.GetProcessor<EnrollmentEventType>();
    Assert.IsInstanceOfType(processor, typeof(EnrollmentEventProcessor));
}
share|improve this answer

What you're looking for is configurable factory. it can be done with dependency injection frameworks, or the easiest way - an external configuration (xml file comes to mind), which will store the list of ur possible implementations and will be loaded/modified on demand.

With this solution you will have something like

<Processors>
  <Processor dllname='' classname=''>
   ....
</Processors>

and you will have to load it, by using reflection / any xml reading technique .net provides you with.

share|improve this answer
1  
.Net supports custom configuration sections. Creating a custom configuration section will completely avoid manually parsing xml and will require only attribute based programming. – jags Oct 11 '12 at 17:24
    
So I know about DI frameworks - this one uses unity and I know how to say IFoo resolves to FOO but for some reason I am just not seeing how that would work here. Even if I configured it right - I don't want to be calling the container inside methods because I need to unit test. – Kenn Oct 11 '12 at 17:28
1  
@Kenn im suggesting something more simple. with this solution you dont need MEF or anything like that. you can just put the list of ur possible dlls/ implementations in ur configuration file, as suggested by jags above, and load/read it using the System.Configuratoin classes, just like you're reading your AppSettings. Then, instead of a hard code if..else section, you will have a dynamicly loaded list, of which you will have to select the appropriate class. – YavgenyP Oct 11 '12 at 17:45

You could use reflection and set the processor-type in theese attributes.

[ProcessorType(typeof(EnrollmentEventProcessor)]
class EnrollmentEvent { ... }

Easy and clean solution. And for the created types i would advice to use a Dictionary<Type, Object> to speed up the access.

share|improve this answer
    
Agree on Dictionary. Looks like it would change GetProcessorFromEventType implementation into a _eventProcessors.TryGetValue(eventType,...) call -- and then you you wouldn't need to change code later when you add more event types. – Daryn Oct 11 '12 at 17:45
1  
I prefer this one, where the events are tagged with the information in code, instead of setting up an extra xml file to parse and configure. – John Gardner Oct 11 '12 at 18:12

I would definitely used a named factory in the DI for this scenario, but I have no experience in Unity (I'm an Autofac guy myself). But I'm a little surprised no one has proposed the naming-convention approach: Let the name of the EventType decide what processor to use. This will require no additional code as new event types and processors are added, as long as the name of the processor follows the convention.

private static Type GetProcessorFromEventType(Type eventType)
{
    // Assuming phrase "Type" only is present at the end of the EventType name
    var processorName = eventType.Name.Replace("Type", "Processor");
    var processorType = Type.GetType(processorName);
    return processorType;
}

Getting the Type.GetType method to resolve type from name gets more difficult if types and processors are in different assemblies, that's the primary reason I would use the DI for this.

share|improve this answer

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