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I am struggling with getting data for a Silverlight 4 app. My View needs to get some information, so it makes a call to my DataProvider. My DataProvider makes a call to Oracle. This is an asynchronous call requiring a callback, so my DataProvider method needs to wait for it. However, if I put a Thread.Sleep loop in my DataProvider method after the asynchronous call, the callback never hits. If I remove the Thread.Sleep loop, the callback hits, but by then my DataProvider method has already finished with nothing to return.

The asynchronicity is of no value to the View; it has to have this data at this time to move on. What I am hoping to be able to figure out is how I can have the DataProvider class make a number of database calls in response to one request from a view, and not return until it is ready. In this case, I don't mind that the view is not responsive; but the way I am doing it is locking up the app altogether.

This is what I have:

The view makes this call:

m_Data = m_DataProvider.GetMyStuffData( some parameters to filter the data );

The DataProvider recognizes the parameters and starts to build up the m_Data object. This requires a number of calls, one of which looks like this:

public override List<MyStuff> GetMyStuff( DateTime _startDay, DateTime _endDay )
{
    var rc = new List<MyStuff>( );
    m_WaitingForData = true;
    var query = MyQueryString;
    var parameters = new string[ ] { "My Parameter" };
    getOracleData(parameters, query, "My Query ID");
    while (m_WaitingForData)
    {
        Thread.Sleep( 20 );
    }
    // process Data which asynchronous call put into a member variable.
    return rc;
}

getOracleData makes an asynchronous call, wiring the callback to GetTable.

The callback method, GetTable, extracts the data into a member variable that GetMyStuff is expecting, turns off m_WaitingForData, and exits.

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up developing this little class:

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Windows;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public class AsyncDataManager
    {
        // This dictionary will help handle waiting for asynchronous data callbacks.
        private Dictionary<string, int[ ]> m_ExpectedData;
        private Action m_FinalProcess;
        private object m_Locker = new object( );
    public AsyncDataManager( Action _finalProcess )
    {
        m_ExpectedData = new Dictionary<string, int[ ]>( );
        m_FinalProcess = _finalProcess;
    }

    public void SetExpectation( string _key, int _occurrances = 1 )
    {
        m_ExpectedData[ _key ] = new[ ] { _occurrances, 0 };
    }

    public void ManageCallbacks( string _key, Action _action = null )
    {
        lock ( m_Locker )
        {
            m_ExpectedData[ _key ][ 1 ]++;
            if ( _action != null )
            {
                _action( );
            }
            // Once all the expected callbacks have been handled, using a 
            // Dispatcher gets us back onto the UI thread and out of the scope of the lock.
            if ( !m_ExpectedData.Values.Any( v => v[ 0 ] != v[ 1 ] ) )
            {
                Deployment.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke( m_FinalProcess );
            }
        }
    }

    // Without requiring that all expected async calls are complete, we can check for a certain set.
    public bool TestForSubsetComplete( params string[ ] _items )
    {
        return ( !m_ExpectedData.Keys.ToList( )
            .Where( k => _items.Contains( k ) )
            .Any( v => m_ExpectedData[ v ][ 0 ] != m_ExpectedData[ v ][ 1 ] ) );
    }
}

}

An example case where I have two calls to make:

var asyncMgr = new AsyncDataManager( ( ) =>
{
    // Code to run after all the async processes are complete
} );
asyncMgr.SetExpectation( "Data1" );
asyncMgr.SetExpectation( "Data2" );
m_DataProvider.GetData1( /* arguments for the call */, ( results ) =>
{
    // store the results, then tell asyncMgr that this process is complete
    asyncMgr.ManageCallbacks( "Data1" );
} );
m_DataProvider.GetData2( /* arguments for the call */, ( results ) =>
{
    // store the results, then tell asyncMgr that this process is complete
    asyncMgr.ManageCallbacks( "Data2" );
} );
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You should use an asynchronous callback

http://www.enterpriseetc.com/post/Three-Ways-to-Handle-Silverlight-Asynchronous-Service-Calls.aspx

Then when the job has finished it will fire the next section of code that you tell it to

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I believe the question sufficiently indicated that I know I need to use an asynchronous callback. The question is about how to wait for the callback. The link provided has a "fake synchronous" process, but it uses a WaitOne on an object it doesn't define or explain, and even then says it "will totally freeze the UI". –  Kelly Cline Oct 17 '12 at 13:22
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