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I have a Linux GNU C project that requires building output for two different hardware devices, using a common C source code base, but different makefiles. Presently I have two makefiles in the same folder, one for each device, and when I make a change to the code, I have to first do "make clean" to make the first model, then "make clean" to make the second model. This is because they use different compilers and processors. Even if a code file didn't change, I have to recompile it for the other device.

What I would like to do is use a different folder for the second model, so it stores a separate copy of *.d and *.o files. I would not have to "make clean", only recompile the changed sources. I have looked at makefile syntax, and being new to Linux, can only scratch my head at the cryptic nature of this stuff.

One method I'm considering would update the .c & .h files from model_1 folder into model_2 folder. Can someone provide me with a simple makefile that will copy only newer *.c and *.h files from one folder to another?

Alternatively, there must be a way to have a common source folder, and separate output folders, so duplicated source files are not required. Any help to achieve that is appreciated. I can provide the makefiles if you want to look at them.

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2  
Show the relevant rules of your Makefile-s that you tried. –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 11 '12 at 17:42
    
It really would help if you showed us your directory structure and makefiles. Otherwise the best we can do is offer high-level advice which you may find difficult to implement. –  Beta Oct 12 '12 at 1:41

3 Answers 3

You want to generated files (object and dependencies) put into a separate folder for each build type as it compiles. Here's what I had do that may work for you:

$(PRODUCT1_OBJDIR)/%.o $(PRODUCT1_OBJDIR)/%.d: %.cpp
        @mkdir -p $(@D)
        $(CXX) $(PRODUCT1_DEPSFLAGS) $(CXXFLAGS) $(INCLUDE_DIR) $< -o $(PRODUCT1_OBJDIR)/$*.o

$(PRODUCT2_OBJDIR)/%.o $(PRODUCT2_OBJDIR)/%.d: %.cpp
        @mkdir -p $(@D)
        $(CXX) $(PRODUCT2_DEPSFLAGS) $(CXXFLAGS) $(INCLUDE_DIR) $< -o $(PRODUCT2_OBJDIR)/$*.o

$PRODUCT1_OBJDIR and $PRODUCT2_OBJDIR are variables names for the directory where you wish to have the generated files stored. This will check for changes to dependencies and recompile if needed.

If you still have problems, get back with feedback, will try and sort you out.

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I decided it would be easier if I just create a simple makefile (for the moment called 'test') that updates the source files from the model1 directory into the model2 directory. The model2 directory has its own makefile specific for building this model. This is what I have. It runs from the 'model2' directory. %.c: ../model1/%.c<lf><tab>cp $< $@<lf> I am testing it with 'make -f test -n' so it doesn't actually do anything, just show me the results. It replies "make: *** no targets. Stop". I have reviewed the GNU Make docs, not getting it. (Note: two-spaces is not working as a line break.) –  pwrgreg007 Oct 17 '12 at 20:35
    
Moderator: can this thread be removed? My original question was probably too vague, and I never got the answer I was looking for. –  pwrgreg007 Oct 19 '12 at 12:11

You could compile your source files to object files in different directories ("folder" is not really the appropriate word on Unix). You just have to set appropriate make rules. And you might use other builders like omake, scons, ...

You could use remake to debug your GNU Makefile-s. You could have inside a rule like

$(OBJDIR)/%.o: $(SRCDIR)/%.c
         $(COMPILE.c) -c $^ -o $@

And you could set (earlier in your Makefile) variables with e.g.

OBJDIR:=obj-$(shell uname -m)

or something better

I do suggest to read GNU make's manual; it has an introduction to makefiles.

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I decided it would be easier if I just create a simple makefile (for the moment called 'test') that updates the source files from the model1 directory into the model2 directory. This is what I have. It runs from the 'model2' directory. *.c: ../model1/*.c cp $< $@ I am testing it with 'make -f test -n' so it doesn't actually do anything, just show me the results. It only shows the first changed file, not all the changed files. (Note: two-spaces is not working as a line break.) –  pwrgreg007 Oct 17 '12 at 17:10
    
*.c: ../model1/*.c cp $< $@ is not working. How should this look? –  pwrgreg007 Oct 17 '12 at 19:16
    
Use % in make rules, not * –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 17 '12 at 19:30
    
Ok I changed it to: %.c:<tab>../model1/%.c<lf><tab>cp $< $@ When I enter "make -f test -n" it replies "make: *** no targets. Stop." What am I missing? –  pwrgreg007 Oct 17 '12 at 19:46
    
How do you get a <newline> in a comment? Two spaces does nothing! –  pwrgreg007 Oct 17 '12 at 19:47

This can be easily achieved with makepp's repository mechanism. If you call makepp -R../src ARCH=whatever then it will symbolically link all parts of ../src under the current directory and compile here.

You can even create a file .makepprc and put in any options specific to this architecture, so you'll never get confused which command to call where.

If your different architectures have identically produced files (like generated sources), you can even build in ../src and the other architecture will pick up everything that doesn't depend on your current compile options.

There is much more to makepp. Besides doing almost all that GNU make can, there are lots more useful things, and you can even extend your makefiles with some Perl programming.

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