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It's easier to state my question with an XML snippet below:

<Hosts>
  <Host Ip1="1.2.3.4" Ip2="1.2.3.5" />
  <Host Ip1="1.2.3.6" Ip2="1.2.3.4" />
  ...
<Hosts>

Is there a way to validate with XSD that the values across all instances of Ip1 and Ip2 attributes are unique? For example, the second element above would fail validation since it's Ip2 value is a duplicate of the Ip1 value of the first element.

Thanks! Pai-Hung

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I would use a combination of XSD and Schematron, since XSD alone can't do it. –  Petru Gardea Oct 13 '12 at 2:28

1 Answer 1

The xsd:unique constraint is intended to provide this kind of functionality, but it is constrained in ad hoc ways that make it hard to see how to express the particular constraint you have in mind. (That is to say, it may be possible to express the constraint you have in mind, but I don't see a way, myself.)

It may be worth while to elaborate the problem, for the benefit of others who read this. The obvious formulation of the constraint would be this:

<!--* Not conformant *-->
<xs:unique name="hostip">
  <xs:selector xpath="Host/@Ip1 | Host/@Ip2"/>
  <xs:field xpath="."/>
</xs:unique>

That's not a conformant uniqueness constraint, though, because the attribute axis is not allowed by the ad hoc constraints governing selectors. (Those constraints were defined to ensure that validators didn't have to hold the entire document in memory and to cover the cases people thought they needed. Apparently no one thought they needed to check uniqueness of attribute node values, so the subset of XPath defined for selectors can only select element nodes. Given the length to which the designers of XSD 1.0 went to try to put elements and attributes on similar footing, this looks like a remarkable design error.)

An alternative formulation may occur to some readers, namely:

<xs:selector xpath="Host"/>
<xs:field xpath="@Ip1|@Ip2"/>

This is also non-conforming, because for any selector, each field expression must return at most one value.

If you can reformulate the XML to take the form

<Hosts>
  <Host>
    <Ip>1.2.3.4</Ip>
    <Ip>1.2.3.5</Ip>
  <Host>
  <Host>
    <Ip>1.2.3.6</Ip>
    <Ip>1.2.3.4</Ip>
  <Host>
  ...
</Hosts> 

then you can enforce the uniqueness constraint you have in mind, by adding the following xs:unique element to the element declaration for Hosts:

<xs:unique name="hostip">
  <xs:selector xpath="Host/Ip"/>
  <xs:field xpath="."/>
</xs:unique>

It has the desired effect of flagging the duplication of 1.2.3.4 as an IP value.

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