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I have a basic client/server application written in Java which uses plain Sockets for communication.

I'd like to prevent passive eavesdropping attacks against it and do the communication over TLS/SSL. I don't want the application user to get in the hassle of setting up certificates etc., I'd like to setup Sockets over SSL with Anonymous Diffie Hellman using AES encryption (TLS_DH_anon_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA mode).

However I can't find any suitable examples on net or any documentation as to how I'd setup the SSLContext or SSLSocketFactory to enable the mode I want. I'd appreciate a minimal example for this.

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1  
You are aware that the anonymous cipher suites are insecure? – EJP Oct 11 '12 at 23:46
    
EJP, As I've stated in my question that my goal is to protect against "passive eavesdropping", I think it fulfills my requirement of security. – sharjeel Oct 14 '12 at 22:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should set the cipher suite on the SSLSocket (or SSLEngine) using setEnabledCipherSuites.

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A small code snippet as example would be very useful. – sharjeel Oct 16 '12 at 19:40
1  
On the SSLSocket you get from your factory, call setEnabledCipherSuites(new String[] { "TLS_DH_anon_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA" }. As EJP said, anonymous cipher suites are insecure against MITM attacks. Often, attackers in a position to perform passive eavesdropping are also in a position to perform MITM attacks. – Bruno Oct 16 '12 at 19:59
    
I wish I could use TLS-PSK but Java doesn't have it :( – sharjeel Oct 16 '12 at 20:06
    
If getting certificates is a problem, you can always use self-signed certificates that you import explicitly in your trust store. I doubt PSK would require less configuration than that. – Bruno Oct 16 '12 at 20:09

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