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I am trying to delete cells in excel with a certain value. I have gotten very far and have written my own script borrowing some excerpts from the internet.

    set theOutputPath to (path to desktop folder as string) & "FilteredNY.csv"
    set fstring to "(Not NY State)"

    tell application "Microsoft Excel"
     activate
     open workbook workbook yatta yatta
activate object worksheet 1
-->activate range current region
set LastRow to ((count of rows of used range of active sheet) + 1)
set lastCol to count of columns of used range of active sheet
set lastCol to (get address of column lastCol without column absolute)
set lastCol to (characters 1 thru ((length of lastCol) div 2) of lastCol as string)
set fullRange to range ("2:" & LastRow)
repeat with i from 2 to LastRow
    --code in repeat 
    if value of cell ("J" & i) is equal to fstring then
        delete range row i
    end if
end repeat
end tell

Most of the code doesn't matter too much including the fullRange variable and the path variable set at the top. The problem is the deletion code doesn't even proceed after row 2 and it runs extremely slowly on top of that so it actually has a lot of problems. I would guess there has to be something wrong with that loop I made. If anyone can set me on the right track that would be great.

I actually recently found the problem after a lot of experimenting/digging around. While I was deleting the ranges the rows actually shifted leading excel to delete the wrong range. I am currently working on a workaround that includes just clearing the rows I don't want and hiding all blank cells then copying all visible cells to a new sheet.

Okay another update, the last update. I finally completed the script allowing it to do what it needs to do. Instead of all the clearing, hiding, and copying I just made the delete work by adding all the rows to be deleted in an array than converted the array to a string of ranges that delete range would work on deleting all the rows in one go. It is a faster and simpler solution.

Here is the great apple script:

 set theOutputPath to (path to desktop folder as string) & "FilteredNY.csv"
 set fstring to "(Not NY State)"
 set del_list to {}

 tell application "Microsoft Excel"
activate
open workbook workbook file name yatta yatta
activate object worksheet 1
set LastRow to ((count of rows of used range of active sheet))

repeat with i from 2 to LastRow
    --code in repeat 
    if value of cell ("J" & i) is equal to fstring then
        set di to i as string
        set end of del_list to di & ":" & di

    end if
end repeat
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to ","
set ToDelete to del_list as string
set AppleScript's text item delimiters to {""}
delete range range ToDelete
  end tell

I hope this helped someone out there! I have a bad habit of solving my own questions. :).

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1 Answer 1

When using Excel with applescript, try to avoid loops and use Excel strength to address a large number of rows/columns in a short amount of time.

For your case, I understood that you want to delete all the rows for which the value of column "J" is "(Not NY State)" You don't touch first row where there must be your column titles.

So here is the code :

tell application "Microsoft Excel"
    set autofilter mode of active sheet to false
    set lastRow to first row index of last row of used range

    autofilter range row ("1:" & lastRow) field 10 criteria1 "(Not NY State)"
    select row ("2:" & lastRow)
    delete selection -- if you want to delete 
    #clear contents selection -- if you only wish to clear the data
end tell

Isn't this faster ?

Bonus trick to speed your code :

tell application "Microsoft Excel" to set screen updating to false --vvv---
-- insert here operations that would change Excel display --
tell application "Microsoft Excel" to set screen updating to true --^^^---

You may also use autofilter + sort

But the real big thing is the subtle use of formulas in Excel to get your things done very quickly. (set one cell's formula then fill down to last row)

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