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I have this code:

BigInteger lhs = new BigInteger(0);
BigInteger rhs = new BigInteger(0);

bool isLeftHandSide = true;

for (int i = 0; i < txtResult.Text.Length; i++)
{
    char currentCharacter = txtResult.Text[i];

    if (char.IsNumber(currentCharacter))
    {
        char currentCharacter = txtResult.Text[i];

        if (isLeftHandSide)
        {
            lhs += (int)char.GetNumericValue(currentCharacter);
        }
        else
        {
            rhs += (int)char.GetNumericValue(currentCharacter);
        }
    }
}

I was wondering if there was a way to instead store a reference to the current side so that I could just manipulate that variable instead and get rid of the if and else statements. I'd like to be able to do this without using unsafe code contexts.

Something like replacing this:

if (isLeftHandSide)
{
    lhs += (int)char.GetNumericValue(currentCharacter);
}
else
{
    rhs += (int)char.GetNumericValue(currentCharacter);
}

With this:

currentSide += (int)char.GetNumericValue(currentCharacter);

Where currentSide is a reference to either lhs or rhs. Because they are structs I'm not sure how to keep a reference to it rather than just copying the data.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
You'll have to add context for the method and the loop. – Henk Holterman Oct 11 '12 at 18:58
1  
Can you put in more context for the code fragments? – Bobson Oct 11 '12 at 18:58
    
Added some more context. – Ryan Peschel Oct 11 '12 at 19:04
    
Your question is still not clear. What sort of object reference are you trying to store? – Ramhound Oct 11 '12 at 19:08
    
Trying to store a reference to a BigInteger. I guess a possible solution is to wrap it in a container class and make it public to get rid of the if statements. – Ryan Peschel Oct 11 '12 at 19:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could capture the variable you want in a lambda, something like this:

Action<int> addToCurrentSide;

BigInteger lhs = new BigInteger(0);
BigInteger rhs = new BigInteger(0);

addToCurrentSide = x => lhs += x;

for (int i = 0; i < txtResult.Text.Length; i++)
{
    char currentCharacter = txtResult.Text[i];

    if (char.IsNumber(currentCharacter))
    {
        char currentCharacter = txtResult.Text[i];

        addToCurrentSide((int)char.GetNumericValue(currentCharacter));
    }
}

and then to switch sides you just reassign addToCurrentSide thus:

addToCurrentSide = x => rhs += x;
share|improve this answer
    
The if is still there, you just described it in text. addToCurrentSide = isLeftHandSide ? x => lhs += x : x => rhs += x; – Henk Holterman Oct 11 '12 at 19:20

All you need is a wrapper class to add an extra layer of indirection. (I find this class useful on occasion, I keep it around as a utility class.)

public class Wrapper<T>
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

Then to use it:

BigInteger lhs = new BigInteger(0);
BigInteger rhs = new BigInteger(0);
Wrapper<BigInteger> currentSide = new Wrapper<BigInteger>();

currentSide.Value = lhs;

for (int i = 0; i < txtResult.Text.Length; i++)
{
    char currentCharacter = txtResult.Text[i];

    if (char.IsNumber(currentCharacter))
    {
        currentSide.Value += (int)char.GetNumericValue(currentCharacter);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, "All problems in computer science can be solved by another level of indirection". I think this one is more direct than a lambda. – Henk Holterman Oct 11 '12 at 20:02

You can not totally remove the if but you can pull it out of the loop:

bool isLeftHandSide = true;

if (isLeftHandSide)
   lhs = NewMethod(lhs, txtResult.Text);
else
   rhs = NewMethod(rhs, txtResult.Text);
share|improve this answer
    
You can get rid of the if. See my answer. – Andrew Cooper Oct 11 '12 at 19:16
1  
@AndrewCooper You only eliminated the if because the boolean value was hard coded to true. If it wasn't known until runtime then you would need the same if statement. Through the same reasoning, Henk's refactor could remove the if and hardcode the use of lhs instead of rhs as you have if he wanted. – Servy Oct 11 '12 at 19:34

You can do that,

var isLeftHandSide = true;
var currentSide = new BigInteger(0);

for (int i = 0; i < txtResult.Text.Length; i++)
{
    char currentCharacter = txtResult.Text[i];
    if (char.IsNumber(currentCharacter))
        currentSide += (int)char.GetNumericValue(currentCharacter);
}

if (isLeftHandSide)
    // lhs = currentSide;
else
    // rhs = currentSide;
share|improve this answer

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