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Success:

>>> scp_cmd = r"sudo scp -i /home/backup/.ssh/id_rsa /opt/backups/*conf backup@a-hostname.local:/opt/backups/"
>>> subprocess.call(scp_cmd, shell=True)
1eadmin1.conf                                                  100%   83KB  83.5KB/s   00:00
1stflr_1.conf                                                  100% 2904     2.8KB/s   00:00
>>> scp_cmd = """sudo scp -i /home/backup/.ssh/id_rsa /opt/backups/*conf backup@a-hostname.local:/opt/backups/"""
>>> os.system(scp_cmd)
1eadmin1.conf                                                  100%   83KB  87.3KB/s   00:00
1stflr_1.conf                                                  100% 2904     3.4KB/s   00:00

Failure:

>>> scp_cmd = r"""sudo scp -i /home/backup/.ssh/id_rsa /opt/backups/*conf backup@a-hostname.local:/opt/backups/"""
>>> subprocess.call(scp_cmd, shell=True)
/opt/backups/*conf: No such file or directory
1
>>> subprocess.call(scp_cmd.split(' '))
/opt/backups/\*conf: No such file or directory
1
>>>
>>> subprocess.call(shlex.split(scp_cmd))
/opt/backups/*conf: No such file or directory
1

I'm confused why the triple quotes fail when I use subprocess.call(), but pass when I use os.system(). Why is there a difference between subprocess.call() and os.system() when handling triple quoted strings?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am pretty certain you are doing something else different; the triple quoting isn't making a difference here at all:

>>> a = r"sudo scp -i /home/backup/.ssh/id_rsa /opt/backups/*conf backup@a-hostname.local:/opt/backups/"
>>> b = r"""sudo scp -i /home/backup/.ssh/id_rsa /opt/backups/*conf backup@a-hostname.local:/opt/backups/"""
>>> a == b
True
>>> b
'sudo scp -i /home/backup/.ssh/id_rsa /opt/backups/*conf backup@a-hostname.local:/opt/backups/'
>>> a
'sudo scp -i /home/backup/.ssh/id_rsa /opt/backups/*conf backup@a-hostname.local:/opt/backups/'

Using triple quoting is just one way to specify a python string literal. How you specified that literal (with or without the r raw prefix, with single or triple quotes, using single ' or double " quotes) is not preserved.

Where triple quoting does make a difference is when you include a newline:

>>> foo = '''
... '''
>>> foo
'\n'

But your examples do not include any newlines at all.

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1  
Indeed, in fact, the first 'Success' example can't work at all. It needs either, shell=True or the command needs to be split. –  Rob Wouters Oct 11 '12 at 19:58
1  
@MikePennington: I find that hard to believe. Something else changed too. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 11 '12 at 19:58
    
@Rob, you're correct and I fixed that in the question; however, that doesn't change the reality that I'm getting failures when I try to scp with triple quotes –  Mike Pennington Oct 11 '12 at 19:59
    
@MikePennington, either your commands run and/or output is wrong or you found a bug in python. In these cases my experience tells me 99.9% it's the former. Please post an entire (i.e. non-interactive) script that exhibits the problem. –  Rob Wouters Oct 11 '12 at 19:59
2  
@MikePennington: I know; the point is that that's the only difference a triple quote makes; it makes it easy to include newlines in your string literal, and it makes it easy to include (single) quote literals. There is no other difference, the strings produced are otherwise the same. You are thus barking up the wrong tree. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 11 '12 at 20:04

+1 to everything Martijn has said, and I think I may know what's going on. This output:

>>> subprocess.call(scp_cmd.split(' '))
/opt/backups/\*conf: No such file or directory

looks suspicious to me. Why is the backslash there?

Doing my best to match your command, I get something like [suppressing only the username]:

>>> import subprocess, shlex
>>> 
>>> subprocess.call(r"scp -i /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa /tmp/*conf user@localhost:/tmp/save", shell=True)
aconf                                    100%    4     0.0KB/s   00:00    
bconf                                    100%    9     0.0KB/s   00:00    
0
>>> subprocess.call(r"""scp -i /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa /tmp/*conf user@localhost:/tmp/save""", shell=True)
aconf                                    100%    4     0.0KB/s   00:00    
bconf                                    100%    9     0.0KB/s   00:00    
0

which works because as explained, they're the same string. But say you had accidentally put a backslash in there? You'd get

>>> subprocess.call(r"""scp -i /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa /tmp/\*conf user@localhost:/tmp/save""", shell=True)
/tmp/*conf: No such file or directory
1
>>> subprocess.call(r"""scp -i /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa /tmp/\*conf user@localhost:/tmp/save""".split(" "))
/tmp/\*conf: No such file or directory
1
>>> subprocess.call(shlex.split(r"""scp -i /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa /tmp/\*conf user@localhost:/tmp/save"""))
/tmp/*conf: No such file or directory
1

which matches your output exactly -- there's no backslash in the output for shell=True or shlex.split(), but there is for .split(" "). For comparison, if there were no backslash, you should instead get the error message

>>> subprocess.call(r"""scp -i /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa /tmp/*conf user@localhost:/tmp/save""".split(" "))
/tmp/*conf: No such file or directory
1

So it seems to me very likely that the scp_cmd you've posted isn't the one your output actually corresponds to, and that your real one has a backslash.

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of course, when you're troubleshooting something for 20 minutes, it doesn't make sense to post all 20 minutes of debugging in the question... yes I experimented with a backslash escape on the *, no that didn't cause the problem –  Mike Pennington Oct 11 '12 at 20:55
    
@MikePennington: respectfully, I don't see how the scp_cmd you posted, which does not contain a backslash, is compatible with the output you posted, which does. I have demonstrated above a prima facie case that inserting one generates your output and not inserting one does not. –  DSM Oct 11 '12 at 21:02
    
You have demonstrated that the question doesn't reflect every single case I tested, and that I hacked the question together imperfectly. For that I apologize... regardless, your conclusion is flawed. The original script which also had the error never had a backslash. –  Mike Pennington Oct 11 '12 at 21:03

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