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I am trying to interweave two files that contain one sentence per line. I double spaced (sed G) the first file and I would like to incorporate the content of the second file into those empty lines.

How can I interweave both files so that the 1st line of file B goes below the 1st line in file A, the 2nd line of file B below the 2nd line of file A, until it reaches the end ?

Example: [line number|sentence number|sentence]

1  1 fileA
2   
3  2 fileA
4  
5  3 fileA
6  
7  4 fileA

Expected result:

1  1 fileA
2  1 FILEB
3  2 fileA
4  2 FILEB
5  3 fileA
6  3 FILEB
7  4 fileA

This is for a bash script: can it be done with sed or awk?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 'R fileB' fileA

You don't need to double space the file first.

If you want to replace the empty lines though:

sed -e '/./!{R fileB' -e ';d}' fileA
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If you have the original unspaced files, you can use paste plus (GNU) sed. I'm assuming there are no ^A (Control-A) characters in your sentences:

paste -d'^A' fileA fileB | sed 's/^A/\n/'

The paste command concatenates lines from the two files, and then the sed replaces the marker, ^A, with a newline. This works well with GNU sed; not so well with BSD sed. You can also use awk:

paste -d'^A' fileA fileB | awk '{sub(/^A/, "\n"); print}'

Remember to type Control-A where the ^A appears in the script.

You could also do it easily with Perl, which would only need a single process instead of two as here.


It also occurs to me that you could convert the control characters with tr, which is arguably simpler:

paste -d'^A' fileA fileB | tr '\001' '\012'  # octal escapes for ^A and NL
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If you un-double space the first file (e.g. with sed -n 1~2p), you can use paste with a newline delimiter (tested with GNU paste):

paste -d'\n' file1 file2

Testing with the files from Birei's answer:

fileA 1
fileB 1
fileA 2
fileB 2
fileA 3
fileB 3
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Using awk:

Assuming fileA with data:

fileA 1
fileA 2
fileA 3

And fileB with:

fileB 1
fileB 2
fileB 3

Run following script:

awk 'FNR < NR { exit; } { getline lineB <ARGV[ARGC-1]; printf "%s\n%s\n", $0, lineB; }' fileA fileB

That yields:

fileA 1
fileB 1
fileA 2
fileB 2
fileA 3
fileB 3
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Another example:

file1

fileA 1
fileA 2
fileA 3

file2

fileB 1
fileB 2
fileB 3

Command:

awk '{getline a < "file2" split(a, b, FS); print NR, $2, $1 "\n" NR+++1, b[2], b[1] }' file1

Result:

$ awk '{getline a < "file2" split(a, b, FS); print NR, $2, $1 "\n" NR+++1, b[2], b[1] }' file1
1 1 fileA
2 1 fileB
3 2 fileA
4 2 fileB
5 3 fileA
6 3 fileB
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