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Would like to do the following by recursion so that I can vary the number of 'for' loops:

n = 5
out = []
for i in range(n):
    for j in range(i,n):
        for k in range(j,n):
            out.append([i,j,k])

To return

out =   [[0 0 0]
         [0 0 1]
         [0 0 2]
         [0 0 3]
         [0 0 4]
         [0 1 1]
         [0 1 2]
         [0 1 3]
         [0 1 4]
         [0 2 2]
         [0 2 3]
         [0 2 4]
         [0 3 3]
         [0 3 4]
         [0 4 4]
         [1 1 1]
         [1 1 2]
         [1 1 3]
         [1 1 4]
         [1 2 2]...]

e.g.

def Recurse(n, p):
  # where p is the number of for loops
  some magic recursion 
  return out

I've had a look at some of the other recursion questions, but struggling to get to the solution.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of using recursion, use itertools.product(), which is equivalent to nested for loops in a generator expression:

>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.product(range(3), repeat=2))
[(0, 0), (0, 1), (0, 2), (1, 0), (1, 1), (1, 2), (2, 0), (2, 1), (2, 2)]
>>> list(itertools.product(range(3), repeat=3))
[(0, 0, 0), (0, 0, 1), (0, 0, 2), (0, 1, 0), (0, 1, 1), (0, 1, 2), (0, 2, 0), (0, 2, 1), (0, 2, 2), (1, 0, 0), (1, 0, 1), (1, 0, 2), (1, 1, 0), (1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 2), (1, 2, 0), (1, 2, 1), (1, 2, 2), (2, 0, 0), (2, 0, 1), (2, 0, 2), (2, 1, 0), (2, 1, 1), (2, 1, 2), (2, 2, 0), (2, 2, 1), (2, 2, 2)]

edit: Didn't realize that this isn't actually a Cartesian product since the inner loops use the outer variable to start the range, here is one possibility but it is not as efficient as it could be because it generates extra values and needs to check that each value is valid:

def nested_loops(n, num_loops):
    prod = itertools.product(range(n), repeat=num_loops)
    for item in prod:
        if all(item[i] <= item[i+1] for i in range(num_loops-1)):
            yield item

>>> list(nested_loops(3, 2))
[(0, 0), (0, 1), (0, 2), (1, 1), (1, 2), (2, 2)]
>>> list(nested_loops(3, 3))
[(0, 0, 0), (0, 0, 1), (0, 0, 2), (0, 1, 1), (0, 1, 2), (0, 2, 2), (1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 2), (1, 2, 2), (2, 2, 2)]
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Arr you beat me to it! : ) –  Thomas Orozco Oct 11 '12 at 20:43
    
I bet this Q is homework where he MUST use recursion ... –  Joran Beasley Oct 11 '12 at 20:44
1  
The OP's desired output isn't the Cartesian product, though -- there's no (1,0,0). Check the range arguments. –  DSM Oct 11 '12 at 20:46
2  
In Python 2.7+. you can just write itertools.combinations_with_replacment(range(n), w), I think. –  DSM Oct 11 '12 at 21:09
1  
@DSM I think you are right, add it as an answer for a +1, that is much better than my hacked together solution! –  Andrew Clark Oct 11 '12 at 21:15

@DSM has a better answer (but in the comments)

However here is a simple recursive solution, in case anyone is struggling to work it out

def f(n, p, start=0):
    if p==0:
        yield []
    else:
        for i in range(start, n):
            for j in f(n, p-1, i):
                yield [i]+j
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