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I have a query that returns 16 columns. 12 of them have similar data (they return values 0, 1 or 2). I want to replace these numbers with letters - 0 with L, 1 with M, and 2 with H.

I can write 12 case statements but that would be overkill and I definitely don't want to do that. I'd much rather convert these values in the front end instead. Is there any way to use something like a function (within the query itself only) which returns the appropriate value?

Please note that I have read only access to the database and there are thousands of databases like these already out there so creating a udf is not possible.

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What is your front end? You could create an enum that maps a character to each numeric value –  msmucker0527 Oct 11 '12 at 20:55
    
.NET (C#). Yes, I could do that but it would be nice to know if there is some way of dealing with such an issue through T-SQL itself. –  Rahul Garg Oct 11 '12 at 21:03
1  
I would just write the case statement. Copy once then paste it 11 times. Change 11 column names. And save the query. –  Blam Oct 11 '12 at 21:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

On your front-end, how about using an enum? You can have enum elements L=0, M=1, H=2. When you pull the (column) data from your DB, cast it to the enum type. When you display it, you can get the enum name by doing a ToString.
Have a look at this MSDN article.

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yup, I will be using an enum if there is no way of doing this in t-sql :) –  Rahul Garg Oct 11 '12 at 21:05

If you only have read access, you can't create a function, but you could create a common table expression and join to it twelve times...

WITH LookupTable (numval, returnletter) as (
    SELECT 0,'L' UNION SELECT 1,'M' UNION SELECT 2,'H')

select LKP1.returnletter as col1,
       LKP2.returnletter as col2
       ...
    from origtable OT
        inner join LookupTable LKP1 on ot.col1 = LKP1.numval
        inner join LookupTable LKP2 on ot.col2 = LKP2.numval
        ....
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I did think about using the approach you suggested but the 12 joins was what kept me from using it. –  Rahul Garg Oct 11 '12 at 21:12
    
Sounds like you'll need to use front end processing then. The benefit of using the CTE is non-existent really with only 3 values. –  Data Masseur Oct 11 '12 at 21:41
    
sounds good... front end it is. –  Rahul Garg Oct 11 '12 at 21:51

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