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Summary

I'm currently creating a 3D tiled hex board in Three.js. For artistic and functional reasons, the tiles are each their own mesh comprised of a basic (unchanging) geometry with a generated array of maps in its material: Displacement, Diffuse, Normal.

I started noticing a reduction in FPS as I added more texture maps, which prompted me to look into the source. I have a 15x15 game board, meaning there are 225 individual meshed being rendered every frame. Each mesh, at the time, was comprised of 215 faces due to poor design, resulting in 48,375 faces in the scene.

Thinking it would cure the performance troubles, I redesigned the mesh to contain only 30 faces, totaling 6,750 faces across the scene; An astounding improvement. I was disappointed to find that an 86% reduction in faces had almost no effect on performance.

So, I resolved to find exactly what was causing the drop in performance. I set up an abstracted test environment, and used a grid of planes, 3x10 (To give them 30 faces, just like my own model). I tried out different grid sizes (Mesh counts) and applied materials of differing complexity. Here's what I found:

Materials Test

// /---------------------------------------------------\
// |      Material       |  15x15  |  20x20  |  25x25  |
// |---------------------|---------|---------|---------|------\
// | Flat Lambert Color  |  60FPS  |  48FPS  |  30FPS  | -00% |
// | Lambert Diffuse     |  57FPS  |  41FPS  |  27FPS  | -10% |
// | Blank Shader        |  51FPS  |  37FPS  |  24FPS  | -20% |
// | Full Shader (-H)    |  49FPS  |  32FPS  |  21FPS  | -30% |
// | Full Shader (+H)    |  42FPS  |  28FPS  |  19FPS  | -37% |
// \----------------------------------------------------------/
//                       |   -00%  |   -33%  |   -55%  |
//                       \-----------------------------/

Rows:

  • MeshLambertMaterial({color}) was my baseline
  • MeshLambertMaterial({map}) suffered roughly a 10% performance hit
  • ShaderMaterial() using Default settings suffered roughly a 20% performance hit
  • ShaderMaterial() using a Diffuse Map suffered roughly a 30% performance hit
  • ShaderMaterial() using a Diffuse+Normal+Displacement maps suffered a 37% performance hit

Columns:

  • 15x15 (225 Meshes) was my baseline
  • 20x20 (400 Meshes) suffered a 33% performance hit
  • 25x25 (625 Meshes) suffered a 55% performance hit

Synopsis

So I learned that there was a significant hit coming from the shaders I'm using and maps I'm applying. However, there's a much larger hit coming from the amount of "things". I wasn't sure if this was faces, meshes or otherwise so I ran another test. Using my baseline material (MeshLambertMaterial({ color: red })), I decided to test two variables: Number of sides and number of meshes. Here's what I found:

Face/Mesh Count Test

// 15x15 (225)  Meshes @ 30 Faces =   6,750 Faces   = 60 FPS
// 20x20 (400)  Meshes @ 30 Faces =  12,000 Faces   = 48 FPS
// 25x25 (625)  Meshes @ 30 Faces =  18,750 Faces   = 30 FPS
// 30x30 (900)  Meshes @ 30 Faces =  27,000 Faces   = 25 FPS
// 40x40 (1600) Meshes @ 30 Faces =  48,000 Faces   = 15 FPS
// 50x50 (2500) Meshes @ 30 Faces =  75,000 Faces   = 10 FPS

// 15x15 (225) Meshes @ 100 Faces =  22,500 Faces   = 60 FPS
// 15x15 (225) Meshes @ 400 Faces =  90,000 Faces   = 60 FPS
// 15x15 (225) Meshes @ 900 Faces = 202,500 Faces   = 60 FPS

Synposis

This seems to show quite conclusively that the quantity of faces involved do not affect the frame rate much, if at all. Rather, that the amount of individual meshes being draw to the scene create virtually all of the performance drag. I'm not sure what exactly causes such lag; I would imagine there is a large amount of overhead per mesh. Perhaps there is away to eliminate some of this overhead?

Considerations

I have already considered merging my geometries. This does almost completely eliminate the drop in frame rate. However, as I stated in the beginning of this article I need each tile to be individually translatable, rotatable, scalable and otherwise modifiable. To my knowledge, this is not possible with merged geometries.

I have also considered defaulting to a merged geometry and recreating the geometries/scenes when a function that alters a tile is called. However, two problems exist with this approach:

  1. With 200-400 individual meshes on the board and being merged, this could take upwards of 1000ms to process and cause a noticeable visual stutter.
  2. Large effects, such as one that might "shake" or "wobble" all tiles simultaneously, would be just as laggy as the board is now and there would be no reason to implement them.

I hope to find a solution that eliminates this performance hit rather than attempts to avoid it.

Question

Which brings me to my question: Is there a more efficient way to render high quantities of individual meshes?

share|improve this question
    
You might find this talk interesting: Google I/O 2011: WebGL Techniques and Performance. It specifically discusses efficiently rendering large numbers of objects. –  Kevin Reid Oct 12 '12 at 0:50
    
I don't know whether this will be helpful or just confusing but this project (boombambeat.googlecode.com/git/index.html) has a shader that draw lots of things with 1 draw call and uses a texture to set the translation, orientation, and color of each individual object. IIRC go into boombambeat.js, comment out "createSpiroGeometryRender();" and comment in "createRepeatedGeometryRenderer();". –  gman Oct 12 '12 at 2:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have already considered merging my geometries. This does almost completely eliminate the drop in frame rate. However, as I stated in the beginning of this article I need each tile to be individually translatable, rotatable, scalable and otherwise modifiable. To my knowledge, this is not possible with merged geometries.

Sure it is. Add a vertex attribute which is an integer identifying the tile a vertex belongs to. Then, you can move tiles individually according to anything you can compute in your vertex shader.

If you need individual data for each tile, such as a transform, you can load it into a texture and use the tile index to lookup values from the texture — you could even arrange so that the texture looks like a (skewed) copy of your hex grid, for easy debugging!

For things like a “shake” effect, you don't even need a texture; just add a uniform variable giving the current time, and compute the shake in a way that's modified by the tile index.

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This seems like an excellent solution. Using this method, would I be able to take these displacements into account when raycasting? Each tile will need to be individually selectable. –  rrowland Oct 12 '12 at 20:06
1  
I would suggest using picking instead: this is where you render your scene (to a renderbuffer) such that every tile has a flat, unique color, then read back the pixel under the cursor and look up what tile has that pixel's color. This way you don't have to write raycasting, and don't have to write any JS code doing transformations. –  Kevin Reid Oct 13 '12 at 1:20
    
Brilliant. You've been extremely helpful. Thank you! –  rrowland Oct 13 '12 at 2:36

I started noticing a reduction in FPS as I added more texture maps...

In general, you want to minimize the state changes for rendering. Changing things like textures or shaders requires sending new information to the GPU. That's not a cheap operation.

A "simple" thing you can try is to render your meshes sorted by material. I use "simple" because if you render your meshes in a tree traversal, you'll have to restructure your rendering code to render by material instead.

See this post from Christer Ericson for other various ways you can optimize your rendering to minimize state changes.

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